AI4_18_2018_5_14_39_PM_MI.jpg
Warm air to cool air

The intention was to pass the hot air through a layer of water to facilitate cooling, using a fan.

The plan

The installation works perfectly for the 400 sq.ft. of outdoor space at Deki Electronics.

The eco-friendly, effective pots

The earthen cones are customised using advanced computational analysis and modern calibration techniques. The physical specifications of each cone is computed with CFD analysis.

Stacked earthen pots

The pots were stacked vertically to provide a large surface areas for cooling, and positioned such that the air does not bounce back to the Genset.

Recycled water

The water used for the installation is the recycled water from the factory.

A sustainable alternative

CoolAnt decreases the temperature to around 35 degrees, giving a drop of about 10-15 degrees.

The CoolAnt Installation

Ant Studio’s primary aim was to achieve an economic and sustainable solution. Turning to primitive methods, they used evaporative cooling to devise their prototype.

CoolAnt at work

Taking this, not only as an achievement, but as a new beginning, Ant Studio is currently working on new permutations and prototypes to adapt the formula indoors.

Ideal for industrial setups

In industrial setups like Deki Electronics, where generator systems are usually placed in setback areas where loading and unloading takes place, this low-cost, energy efficient solution is perfect for external cooling.

AI4_18_2018_5_14_39_PM_MI.jpg
Lab 18 Apr 2018

Meet CoolAnt, a new way to save both energy and the environment, while cooling external spaces

Indian summers are supremely hot and the addition of excessive heat from generators and the effects of global warming have worsened the situation. Common methods of air conditioning are inefficient due to high loads on them, therefore dropping productivity to a minimum. This is where Ant Studio steps in. Ant Studio devised a simple yet innovative technique to combat the heat, without relying on excess energy or expense.

Deki Electronics, a small scale industry, located in Uttar Pradesh was one among the vast majority of India’s population, unable to cope with the ferocity of the climate. Being an industrial building, they also had the added disadvantage of a diesel generator at the entrance that increased the temperature and the load on the existing AC further. Unlike most corporates, they believed that turning to big air-conditioning systems was not a viable solution. Not only are large air conditioning systems uneconomical, but they are also energy inefficient and contribute to environmental deterioration.

They chose Ant Studio instead.

A sustainable alternative

CoolAnt decreases the temperature to around 35 degrees, giving a drop of about 10-15 degrees.

The technique

Ant Studio’s primary aim was to achieve an economic and sustainable solution. Turning to primitive methods, they used evaporative cooling to devise their prototype. The structure, inspired by a beehive, is made from earthen cones customised using advanced computational analysis and modern calibration techniques. The physical specifications of each cone is computed with CFD analysis. 

Warm air to cool air

The intention was to pass the hot air through a layer of water to facilitate cooling, using a fan.

“In industrial setups like Deki Electronics, where generator systems are usually placed in setback areas where loading and unloading takes place, this low-cost, energy efficient solution is perfect for external cooling.”

The pots were stacked vertically to provide a large surface areas for cooling, and positioned such that the air does not bounce back to the Genset. The intention was to pass the hot air through a layer of water to facilitate cooling, using a fan.

 When the atmospheric temperature is around 40-45 degrees, the temperature around the DG set (when the radiator was switched on) usually rises beyond 50 degrees. CoolAnt decreases the temperature to around 35 degrees, giving a drop of about 10-15 degrees in the DG set area. The installation therefore, works perfectly for the 400 sq.ft. of outdoor space at Deki Electronics. 

The eco-friendly, effective pots

The earthen cones are customised using advanced computational analysis and modern calibration techniques. The physical specifications of each cone is computed with CFD analysis.

An environmentally friendly alternative

CoolAnt is made out of eathenen cones, the material not only stays cool for long hours, but is also sustainable. Recycled water used for the prototype, making the system even more sustainable. Although the recycled water might cause the installation to require regular clean up of the pores on earthen structure, regular water could be substituted to provide long term performance. Since the water is required to be run over the prototype only once or twice a day, it doesn’t amount to large quantities of wasted water either. The installation is also equipped to go from low-energy, to zero-energy, if water is poured manually. Although not ideal, this lets the installation run even in case of power shortages. 

The plan

The installation works perfectly for the 400 sq.ft. of outdoor space at Deki Electronics.

Stacked earthen pots

The pots were stacked vertically to provide a large surface areas for cooling, and positioned such that the air does not bounce back to the Genset.

In industrial setups like Deki Electronics, where generator systems are usually placed in setback areas where loading and unloading takes place, this low-cost, energy efficient solution is perfect for external cooling. Taking this, not only as an achievement, but as a new beginning, Ant Studio is currently working on new permutations and prototypes to adapt the formula indoors. 

Recycled water

The water used for the installation is the recycled water from the factory.

The CoolAnt Installation

Ant Studio’s primary aim was to achieve an economic and sustainable solution. Turning to primitive methods, they used evaporative cooling to devise their prototype.

To know more about Ant Studio’s Architecture + Technology work, visit their website.