AI9_6_2017_3_59_10_AM_Divyakshimain.jpeg
Sharjah

A Mumbai-based photographer, Divyakshi Gupta blogs about her travel and all that intrigues herat the Quirky Wanderer.

At Kochi (Jew street)

What began as great subjects for photography 8-years ago, translated to a passion that Divyakshi practices till date. Her love for doors was soon noticed by Wordpress.com, making her the first Indian travel blogger to be featured by the website.

Varanasi Door of Durga Temple

Apart from her personal documentation of doors, Divyakshi has been working on the #DoorsOfIndia project for a while. Conceptualised by JWT and Hungama Digital Services for Tata Steel’s Pravesh door, #DoorsOfIndia is a PAN India campaign that documents doors. As part of a team of 6 influencers who set out on a journey to discover and unearth door stories, Divyakshi journeyed to the South East of India.

Bhutan

While in India, her favorite doors were mapped in the interiors of Punjab, villages of Uttar Pradesh, temples of South India and the forts and palaces of Rajasthan. Travelling to Bhutan, Divyakshi realized that the doors were nothing short of paintings, especially the Italian doors that displayed a burst of colours.

(Left) The Mehrangarh Palace door (Right) The Orange door of the Vindhya Vasini Temple

The Orange door is nestled within a village at Vindhyachal and the Mehrangarh Palace door is one of the first doors she photographed.

The Mathura Bazaar door

Captured at early dawn on the streets of Mathura when neither the streets nor shutters were open for business.

The door of the Badrinarayan Temple, Batseri

She was persuaded to realize and think about the skills the artisans must have possessed to craft this extraordinary piece.

The Amritsar door

A complete wreck and a pre partition home at Amritsar, Divyakshi believes that the stories of its past have been imprinted on every tear of its surface.

Jat Architecture

Divyakshi adores the arched doorways of the Jat architecture seen at the border towns of Rajasthan and Uttar Pradesh.

AI9_6_2017_3_59_10_AM_Divyakshimain.jpeg
Showcase 25 Aug 2017

Elements: Doors. Photographer Divyakshi Gupta documents Doors of India

CQ talks to Divyakshi Gupta, photographer and blogger at the Quirky Wanderer about her projects, her ongoing journey with doors and a few favourites from her collection.

If we could only look into the stories that ancient doors have kept to themselves for decades, some, even centuries, we’d probably never look at the world the same way. A significant object, a door can provide insight into an era or narrate tales, but we have probably failed to fathom the treasure present before our eyes. But we are reminded that we can still acknowledge the beauty of these objects through Divyakshi’s series documenting her love for ancient doors.

A Mumbai-based photographer, Divyakshi Gupta blogs about her travel and all that intrigues her, at the Quirky Wanderer. While ancient or vintage doors hold a special place in her heart, her Instagram profile also documents images of streets, monuments, colours, textures, people and even personal stories.

Sharjah

A Mumbai-based photographer, Divyakshi Gupta blogs about her travel and all that intrigues herat the Quirky Wanderer.

What made her document doors in particular?

What began as great subjects for photography 8-years ago, translated to a passion that Divyakshi practices till date. Her love for doors was soon noticed by Wordpress.com, making her the first Indian travel blogger to be featured by the website.

Helping us understand what she sees through doors, she says, “Doors intrigue me beyond being merely pretty frames. I often thought doors were veils to homes, hiding an array of emotions, secrets and mysteries. Each door has a distinct character and speaks volumes of its inmates and their personalities. Over the years, I’ve personified them. Some seemed chirpy, some hopeful, some waiting, some mere attention seekers!”

At Kochi (Jew street)

What began as great subjects for photography 8-years ago, translated to a passion that Divyakshi practices till date. Her love for doors was soon noticed by Wordpress.com, making her the first Indian travel blogger to be featured by the website.

How far does her search for doors span?

Divyakshi would probably thank her parents for all those road trips she often took with them that prompted her to fall in love with exploring. When out on the road, she had the opportunity to explore nooks and corners of the country. This eventually led her to find her way to doors, especially the country doors that she describes as colourful, lively and vibrant.

Varanasi Door of Durga Temple

Apart from her personal documentation of doors, Divyakshi has been working on the #DoorsOfIndia project for a while. Conceptualised by JWT and Hungama Digital Services for Tata Steel’s Pravesh door, #DoorsOfIndia is a PAN India campaign that documents doors. As part of a team of 6 influencers who set out on a journey to discover and unearth door stories, Divyakshi journeyed to the South East of India.

While in India, her favorite doors were mapped in the interiors of Punjab, villages of Uttar Pradesh, temples of South India and the forts and palaces of Rajasthan. Travelling to Bhutan, Divyakshi realized that the doors were nothing short of paintings, especially the Italian doors that displayed a burst of colours.

Bhutan

While in India, her favorite doors were mapped in the interiors of Punjab, villages of Uttar Pradesh, temples of South India and the forts and palaces of Rajasthan. Travelling to Bhutan, Divyakshi realized that the doors were nothing short of paintings, especially the Italian doors that displayed a burst of colours.

A Mumbai-based photographer, Divyakshi Gupta blogs about her travel and all that intrigues her, at the Quirky Wanderer. While ancient or vintage doors hold a special place in her heart, her Instagram profile also documents images of streets, monuments, colours, textures, people and even personal stories.

If she were to display a collection, she’d pick these:

The Orange door of the Vindhya Vasini Temple: Nestled within a village at Vindhyachal, Divyakshi conveyed that she felt the orange door brought out, “the essence of the temple, devotion and Indian-ness.”

The Mehrangarh Palace door: This door remains truly special for Divyakshi, as it was the first ever door she had captured.

(Left) The Mehrangarh Palace door (Right) The Orange door of the Vindhya Vasini Temple

The Orange door is nestled within a village at Vindhyachal and the Mehrangarh Palace door is one of the first doors she photographed.

The Mathura Bazaar door: Captured at early dawn on the streets of Mathura when neither the streets nor shutters were open for business.

The Mathura Bazaar door

Captured at early dawn on the streets of Mathura when neither the streets nor shutters were open for business.

The door of the Badrinarayan Temple, Batseri: She was persuaded to realize and think about the skills the artisans must have possessed to craft this extraordinary piece.

The door of the Badrinarayan Temple, Batseri

She was persuaded to realize and think about the skills the artisans must have possessed to craft this extraordinary piece.

The Amritsar door: A complete wreck and a pre partition home at Amritsar, Divyakshi believes that the stories of its past have been imprinted on every tear of its surface.

The Amritsar door

A complete wreck and a pre partition home at Amritsar, Divyakshi believes that the stories of its past have been imprinted on every tear of its surface.

Doors that show Jat Architecture: Divyakshi adores the arched doorways of the Jat architecture seen at the border towns of Rajasthan and Uttar Pradesh.

Jat Architecture

Divyakshi adores the arched doorways of the Jat architecture seen at the border towns of Rajasthan and Uttar Pradesh.

 #DoorsOfIndia

Apart from her personal documentation of doors, Divyakshi has been working on the #DoorsOfIndia project for a while. Conceptualised by JWT and Hungama Digital Services for Tata Steel’s Pravesh door, #DoorsOfIndia is a PAN India campaign that documents doors. As part of a team of 6 influencers who set out on a journey to discover and unearth door stories, Divyakshi journeyed to the South East of India.

In all her journeys, there’s one thing that she takes back home. Explaining this, she says, “People often are amused when they see me documenting their doors. What is so fascinating about them? I shrug and say, we don't make them like these in the cities. I have observed that doors are often the most overlooked aspect, despite being the first impression and the last goodbye. Picture this: You come in contact with your door so many times a day, but how many times have you noticed it? Doors are indeed stories. Some have stories behind them, some around them and some are stories in themselves.”

An avid traveller, Divyakshi is constantly on the move capturing beautiful doors and stories. To know more about her work, look up www.quirkywanderer.com