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The Collage house

It features hundred-year-old columns repurposed from a dismantled house, but balances the same with elements like the lightweight steel and glass pavilion looking onto the hill.

the courtyard

The living spaces, are in fact built around the courtyard, bringing the house together.

the corner of windows

Made out of an array of old, discarded windows and doors from demolished structures, the façade serves as the perfect backdrop for the living room’s otherwise subtle ambience.

The making of the corner of windows

Each colour and style of the ‘corner of windows’ stands as a vivid contrast to the exposed concrete ceiling and the white marble floor.

A sectional view of the structure
the planning

Driven by intensive proficiency of the city of Bombay, the architects at S+PS drafted the Collage House.

Features adorning the house

The house is wrapped and held together by a concrete frame, finished with rough aggregate on the exterior, that smoothes as it seeps into the interiors.

A look at the bedroom

Although it was designed to be a contemporary piece, the house borrows many of its design features from history.

The in-house elevator
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Workspace 06 Nov 2017

The Collage House by S+PS Architects – an ensemble of assorted bits and pieces of Bombay

Located in Navi Mumbai, the house set on Parsik Hill, makes the most of the 350 square metres plot of land it stands on. The project takes up the idea of recycling and collage on several fronts, right from the functional or obvious considerations of material and energy, to the more intangible qualities of history, space and time. Reflecting the spirit of the city it sits in, the house is a blend of characters, both old and new.

Bombay, the city with a soul as intricate as the lives woven into it, is one where people from all socio-economic stratas reside together in chaotic harmony. The inherent wisdom in this city is abundant, whether it's the ingenious adaptability, or the frugality or the resourcefulness. Over 18 million people share about 157 square kilometres of area and resources, needless to say just about anything and everything is reused. Driven by intensive proficiency of the city, the architects at S+PS drafted the Collage House.

Although it was designed to be a contemporary piece, the house borrows many of its design features from history. 

The Collage house

It features hundred-year-old columns repurposed from a dismantled house, but balances the same with elements like the lightweight steel and glass pavilion looking onto the hill.

The Courtyard System

Historically, the courtyard is the most salient feature of traditional houses in India. The living spaces, are in fact built around the courtyard, bringing the house together. Considering that the allocated site was set amidst neighbours on all sides, the crew took to designing a courtyard, albeit with a touch of modernism. Applying the basic concepts of sustainability, the court was raised a floor above the ground level, automatically converting the ground level into a large rainwater harvesting tank. The tank is wrapped with rocks removed during the excavation of the site, furthering the idea of reuse. 

the courtyard

The living spaces, are in fact built around the courtyard, bringing the house together.

The Repurposed Materials

Walking into the house, the first thing that catches one’s attention is the ‘corner of windows’ that adorns the façade. Made out of an array of old, discarded windows and doors from demolished structures, the façade serves as the perfect backdrop for the living room’s otherwise subtle ambience. Each colour and style of the windows featured on the ‘corner of windows’ stands as a vivid contrast to the exposed concrete ceiling and the white marble floor. 

the corner of windows

Made out of an array of old, discarded windows and doors from demolished structures, the façade serves as the perfect backdrop for the living room’s otherwise subtle ambience.

 
The making of the corner of windows

Each colour and style of the ‘corner of windows’ stands as a vivid contrast to the exposed concrete ceiling and the white marble floor.

“In the composition, one finds the  recycling of materials like old textile blocks, floors crafted out of old Burma teak rafters and purlins, colonial furniture, fabric waste along with new ways of using traditional elements.”

The intriguing living room leads to the central courtyard, one that boasts of its own display of features. Administering the rainwater system underneath the courtyard is the ‘pipe wall’. Fabricated out of metal pipe leftovers pieced together like bamboo, the pipe wall serves as a structural column, a rainwater downtake pipe as well as a sculpture of spouts. The wall facing the pipe wall retains a planter, and is embellished with Kitsch tile sample leftovers from older projects done by the architects. 

A sectional view of the structure

A familiarly new space

The house plays on the idea of contrasting the familiar with the new, as it features hundred-year-old columns repurposed from a dismantled house, but balances the same with elements like the lightweight steel and glass pavilion looking onto the hill.

Moulding this structure to fit into the realm of the ‘concrete jungle’, the house is wrapped and held together by a concrete frame, finished with rough aggregate on the exterior, that smoothes as it seeps into the interiors. 

Features adorning the house

The house is wrapped and held together by a concrete frame, finished with rough aggregate on the exterior, that smoothes as it seeps into the interiors.

 
A look at the bedroom

Although it was designed to be a contemporary piece, the house borrows many of its design features from history.

In the composition, one finds the  recycling of materials like old textile blocks, floors crafted out of old Burma teak rafters and purlins, colonial furniture, fabric waste along with new ways of using traditional elements and materials like carved wooden mouldings, beveled mirrors, heritage cement tiles and solar panels.

the planning

Driven by intensive proficiency of the city of Bombay, the architects at S+PS drafted the Collage House.

The language that writes this house forms a strangely familiar but at the same time starkly new pattern, leaving us in awe of its charm. 

The in-house elevator

The firm founded by Pinkish Shah and Shilpa Gore-Shah works in a wide array of fields, including architecture, interior design, urban design and conservation. To keep up with their work, follow them on their Facebook page.