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Transition by Material Immaterial at India Design, 2017

Interestingly, each texture was applied to a set of structures that depicted a specific era or style of architecture. While the Royale Play Archi Concrete texture was applied to a structure representing Medieval architecture, the Royale Play Teodorico and Royale Play Ironic were applied to the Mesopotamian ziggurat and the Roman aqueducts respectively.

Miniature Pots

From miniature clay pots and human figures, personal collectables hand-picked over the years to a huge wooden plank with ceramic toys, there’s so much to explore in the happy miniature sanctuary of the Material Immaterial studio.

Miniature animal figurines
Miniature Concrete Homes

These 9 pieces of their

One of the pieces from
Micro Concrete Cufflink

Falling under the Elements collection are Cufflinks that are made from sterling silver and concrete, and that take the form of miniature architectural elements.

Micro Concrete Earrings

Seen in 7 unique designs, these micro concrete with sterling silver pieces take the form of geometrical patterns.

Concrete Door Handle

Do look out for their concrete door handle and knob collection that has been inspired by Carlo Scarpa’s work. Durable in nature, even though they appear tough and sharp they actually come across quite soft on the skin.

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Lab 31 Mar 2017

Exploring Concrete with Material Immaterial

Taking you through Material Immaterial Studio’s creative works, we’ll be talking about their installation ‘Transition’ at India Design 2017 in collaboration with Asian Paints and their most popular concrete based products.

Asian Paints in collaboration with Material Immaterial Studio displayed a unique installation, ‘Transition’ at India Design, 2017. With the intention of championing Asian Paint textures, the studio produced an interactive installation around three textures, namely, royale play archi concrete, royale play teodorico and royale play ironic.

Transition by Material Immaterial at India Design, 2017

Interestingly, each texture was applied to a set of structures that depicted a specific era or style of architecture. While the Royale Play Archi Concrete texture was applied to a structure representing Medieval architecture, the Royale Play Teodorico and Royale Play Ironic were applied to the Mesopotamian ziggurat and the Roman aqueducts respectively.

As architects with a running practice called the White Room, and who loves working with the idea of ‘Space’, Nitin and Disney chose to showcase a rather interactive installation within a 5 x 8 space. Seems little right? When Asian Paints approached them to work on something beautiful within this tiny little space, they knew just what they had to do. Excluding all possibilities of an inactive piece, they instead worked to have the viewers enjoy an imaginary experience. Keeping this in mind, the studio built a Fort-like setup with rolling balls that swirled through purposed obstacles and passageways, ultimately making their way to a given destination: a spiralling downward well at the centre.  

The purpose was to replace a human with the dwindling ball, let them consume the experiences as if they were travelling through the multiple spaces like the ball itself. Barchha goes on to explain that had this not been an interactive piece of work, not many would have really stopped to look around. Despite the inclusion of the manual ball-loading mechanism, viewers were forced to stop and look. Assuming that an average onlooker would spend at least a minute to understand or trace the movement of the ball, they used this opportunity to draw the spectator’s attention to the textures displayed in the bargain.

Interestingly, each texture was applied to a set of structures that depicted a specific era or style of architecture. While the Royale Play Archi Concrete texture was applied to a structure representing Medieval architecture, the Royale Play Teodorico and Royale Play Ironic were applied to the Mesopotamian ziggurat and the Roman aqueducts respectively. Barchha began reminiscing his childhood through the installation exclaiming, “You’re never too old to play!” The idea was to transport the viewers back to their childhood memories and evoke that nostalgic happiness, lost somewhere on their path to adulthood.

The struggle was real for the studio, as not only did they find themselves in a dilemma to complete this piece in a few weeks but they also had to look for the right craftsmen to perfect the task. While it took them a good one-month to design the layout, after much searching, he found the craftsmen or production crew who helped complete this installation in a week, which was then shipped to Delhi to India Design 2017. When asked if there was anything they would change if they had enough time on their hands, Nitin suggested that he’d love to motorize the ball-reshuffling mechanism, any day.

Miniature Pots

From miniature clay pots and human figures, personal collectables hand-picked over the years to a huge wooden plank with ceramic toys, there’s so much to explore in the happy miniature sanctuary of the Material Immaterial studio.

Miniature animal figurines

Founded by Nitin Barchha and Disney Davis, the Mumbai-based Material Immaterial studio anchors its workstation in a quiet by-lane of Prabhadevi. Stationed within a residential complex that welcomes you with beautiful road art, you’ll fail to recognize the studio and its massive pivoted front door with its shutters rolled down. At Least, we did! Partitioning the studio when opened, you’ll fall in love with the way the door glides forward and backward. Leaving aside the beauty of the front door, the studio displays miniature objects, almost everywhere. From miniature clay pots and human figures, personal collectables hand-picked over the years to a huge wooden plank with ceramic toys, there’s so much to explore in this happy miniature sanctuary.

The duo have grounded the studio to the bare beauty and simplicity of materials, in its most natural form. As “purists”, product designers and architects, the duo often take up projects revolving around volume and space. Following the reduction process, the two always strive to understand what could be left out than what to add in, thereby discovering the richness that could be extracted in the bargain.

Miniature Concrete Homes

These 9 pieces of their

One of the pieces from

Recognized for their work, ‘Spaces’, they designed and produced 9 beautiful concrete pieces resembling miniature building together act as a metaphor to contemporary architectural design. These 9 pieces have been inspired by several 20th century works such as Villa Savoye by Le Corbusier, Falling Water by Frank Lloyd and Church of the Light by Tadao Ando.  

The purpose of ‘Spaces’ was to celebrate the strength and power released by concrete beauty and its contribution and ability to re-define modernism. Each miniature piece isn’t just a block of concrete, rather it is built to evoke curiosity each time you lay eyes on the beauty it manifests. Crafted with a peculiar concrete mix that’s been ideally designed to scale a creamy concrete finish, you could as well employ these miniature homes as a desktop toy or a collectible for that matter.

Micro Concrete Cufflink

Falling under the Elements collection are Cufflinks that are made from sterling silver and concrete, and that take the form of miniature architectural elements.

While ‘Spaces’ is an absolute favourite, you’ll also be glad to know that the Material Immaterial Studio also thrives upon several other inspiring creations. Falling under the Elements collection are Cufflinks that are made from sterling silver and concrete, and that take the form of miniature architectural elements. The first batch was designed and produced at the Material Immaterial Studio through a 12 month duration.

Micro Concrete Earrings

Seen in 7 unique designs, these micro concrete with sterling silver pieces take the form of geometrical patterns.

Concrete Door Handle

Do look out for their concrete door handle and knob collection that has been inspired by Carlo Scarpa’s work. Durable in nature, even though they appear tough and sharp they actually come across quite soft on the skin.

If you stroll around the Material Immaterial website, you’ll also stumble upon beautiful earring sets. Seen in 7 unique designs, these micro concrete with sterling silver pieces take the form of geometrical patterns. Do look out for their concrete door handle and knob collection that has been inspired by Carlo Scarpa’s work. Durable in nature, even though they appear tough and sharp they actually come across quite soft on the skin.

Barchha doesn’t believe in the repetition of designs or concepts, so chances are that you may not stumble upon an existing product, a few months from now. Instead, he’ll introduce you to never seen before designs and concepts, keep a watch!