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Jannick Deslauriers

Her works often hold representations of damaged architecture or broken structures, that when materialised as transparent sculptures, evoke the contrast between the materiality and the nature of the object represented.

Jannick at work

The sculptures she crafts often refer to a real life catastrophe, or phenomenon that she had only experienced through media and images on the web, till they come to life in her studio.

Sentence, Breath and Shroud

"I wanted to install the reminiscence of a drama – not referring to a specific event but more speaking about the idea of violence in general."

The fragile details

Heavily detailed, and seductive through its use of material, the work attracted a lot of visitors.

A startling contrast

Her work opposes the awfulness of the violent situation by painting it in delicate details.

Violence painted through soft textiles

Jannick reflected on how this mimicked the experience we often have with media – seeing images of drama from far away, the more we see it, the more we want to see it and the more we get use to it.

Fabricated sculptures

The work is realized using mainly translucent textile such as crinoline and silk, along with aluminum mesh.

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Lab 19 Mar 2019

Jannick Deslauriers explores the traces we leave behind as humans, through her delicate sculptures

Traditionally sculpture is a craft associated with solid, hard mediums, such as the marble statues of ancient Greece, or the bronze ones of the Indian Subcontinent. Even on CQ, we’ve discussed a fair amount of contemporary sculptures be it Differniture’s plywood sculptures or David Businelli’s sculpted walls. But never before have we come across sculptures devised from textiles. Jannick’s translucent textile sculptures have an ethereal uniqueness to them that we just had to unravel more of.

Like every art student Jannick did her fair share of experimenting with different mediums and artforms till she found the material and technique that called out to her. That happened to be textiles. Her works often hold representations of damaged architecture or broken structures, that when materialised as transparent sculptures, evoke the contrast between the materiality and the nature of the object represented. The sculptures she crafts often refer to a real life catastrophe, or phenomenon that she had only experienced through media and images on the web, till they come to life in her studio.

Jannick Deslauriers

Her works often hold representations of damaged architecture or broken structures, that when materialised as transparent sculptures, evoke the contrast between the materiality and the nature of the object represented.

Sentence, Breath and Shroud

This idea comes through the clearest in “Sentence, Breath and Shroud” – her latest and largest (completed) structure. “My intention to build an exploded car was, obviously, referring to a car bombing. I wanted to install the reminiscence of a drama – not referring to a specific event but more speaking about the idea of violence in general,” she explains. Her work opposes the awfulness of the violent situation by painting it in delicate details.

Sentence, Breath and Shroud

"I wanted to install the reminiscence of a drama – not referring to a specific event but more speaking about the idea of violence in general."

The fragile details

Heavily detailed, and seductive through its use of material, the work attracted a lot of visitors.

“I wanted to install the reminiscence of a drama – not referring to a specific event but more speaking about the idea of violence in general.”

Heavily detailed, and seductive through its use of material, the work attracted a lot of visitors, who – as Jannick noted – spent long periods of time observing the details. She reflected on how this mimicked the experience we often have with media – seeing images of drama from far away, the more we see it, the more we want to see it and the more we get use to it. To immerse ourselves further into the process, we asked her to take us through what she’s currently bringing to life.

A startling contrast

Her work opposes the awfulness of the violent situation by painting it in delicate details.

Transitory Journey

This project is composed of different sculptural elements set in order to create a perspective in the space, the biggest being a life-sized of a shipping container with human bodies falling out of it’s half-open doors. “The ephemeral and misty flow of inert, hollowed out bodies will echo the global migratory flow and the sometimes fatal stories it engenders,” she speculates. The weightlessness and sense of slow progression depicted by the series of sculptures connotes the waves of transnational diasporas that often exist without our knowledge, in a framework that is really inaccessible.

Violence painted through soft textiles

Jannick reflected on how this mimicked the experience we often have with media – seeing images of drama from far away, the more we see it, the more we want to see it and the more we get use to it.

“As I often say, my pieces are like permanent ghost as opposed to the ephemerality of the material I work from.”

The work is realized using mainly translucent textile such as crinoline and silk, along with aluminum mesh – sewn with the fabrics to stabilize the shape. While the project is to launch in Montreal, she aims for it to be presented around the world – ideally in port cities where it would cohere more.

Jannick at work

The sculptures she crafts often refer to a real life catastrophe, or phenomenon that she had only experienced through media and images on the web, till they come to life in her studio.

About her plans for the future, she says her dream is to showcase her ideas globally – through International Biennales and museum exhibitions. We sure hope the curators of Kochi-Muziris Biennale are listening!

To take a look at more of her ethereal work, check out her website.