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Fostering accessibility

Project Circleg provides amputees an affordable solution for a better life while taking care of our plastic pollution problem

Made for you

The prosthetics are customizable to suit the needs of its diverse users

Parts of a whole

The easy production process and modular nature of the parts cuts prosthetics’ cost and assembly effort to a great extent

Deconstructed

Most parts required to make Project Circleg’s prosthetic leg are made of recycled plastic

Enable and empower

Project Circleg helps amputees lead an independent life, creating a positive social impact

Design for difference

Project Circleg’s design solution address two problems at the same time, giving us a better outlet to repurpose our plastic waste

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Lab 22 Mar 2019

Plastics 2.0: Here’s how Project Circleg is enabling accessibility with plastic prosthetics

What if a thoughtful design initiative could solve two pressing problems that plague third-world countries? Co-founded by industrial designers Fabian Engel and Simon Oschwald, Project Circleg steps up to the challenge, as it fights the world’s plastic pollution and helps those who need prosthetics by producing low-cost lower-limb prosthetics made from plastic waste.

The needs of amputees in developing countries are largely overlooked. Prosthetics are generally expensive, difficult to obtain, or technologically outdated. After all, looking at the situation rather cynically, there’s hardly any profit-backed logic that would justify pursuing idealistic, low-cost, accessible-to-all solutions to overcome disability in a price-sensitive market, right? But, thankfully, Project Circleg doesn’t subscribe to this thought process. In fact, it goes on to tackle two problems with its design solution – disability and plastic pollution!

Fostering accessibility

Project Circleg provides amputees an affordable solution for a better life while taking care of our plastic pollution problem

Two problems – one design solution

Project Circleg is a lower-limb prosthetic system intended to help amputees in developing countries. In effect, it gives amputees a new lease of life, renewed confidence to live an independent life, and fulfil their aspirations. What’s special about the initiative is that it uses recycled plastic waste to make these prosthetics with very simple production methods. This enables the production to be implemented locally, cutting costs drastically and making the prosthetics more accessible. Thus, Project Circleg is a perfectly scalable initiative that not only provides affordable prosthetics where they are needed the most, but also offers a meaningful solution to our plastic waste problem.

Made for you

The prosthetics are customizable to suit the needs of its diverse users

Parts of a whole

The easy production process and modular nature of the parts cuts prosthetics’ cost and assembly effort to a great extent

Project Circleg is a perfectly scalable initiative that not only provides affordable prosthetics where they are needed the most, but also offers a meaningful solution to our plastic waste problem.

The journey from humble beginnings to significant social impact

The initiative started as a university project by industrial design students Fabian Engel and Simon Oschwald at the Zurich University of the Arts last year, evolving into the social-impact business it is now. The duo has further streamlined it into a business model with implementation in Kenya and Uganda at the moment.

Deconstructed

Most parts required to make Project Circleg’s prosthetic leg are made of recycled plastic

The initiative is based on the circular economy system that is primarily aimed at minimizing waste and optimizing resource use. Landfills are common in developing countries and the lack of capacity and laws for effective recycling is a massive problem. By using this waste plastic as a resource, Project Circleg tackles a pressing environmental issue while addressing an urgent social requirement.

Enable and empower

Project Circleg helps amputees lead an independent life, creating a positive social impact

Customize and make it your own

The design process is extremely user-centric, enabling the designer duo to integrate local production potential, needs of those requiring prosthetics, as well as future maintenance issues into the holistic Project Circleg system. The prosthetics can be adjusted to best suit the person using them, taking into consideration individual factors such as leg length or foot size. Further, the modular design allows for the use of colours as preferred, making Project Circleg extremely customizable, and therefore an ideal solution for anyone and everyone using it!

Design for difference

Project Circleg’s design solution address two problems at the same time, giving us a better outlet to repurpose our plastic waste

There is only so much we could cover in this post, so head over to Project Circleg’s website for more details.

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