AI7_20_2017_3_10_56_AM_Phillipmain.jpg

Remember the salt and pattern that our television sets displayed when their antennas did not receive signal? Known as ‘binary noise’, that was probably the first digital glitch our generation experienced. Phillip Stearns creates and draws inspirations from such ‘glitches’ and weaves them into textiles!

Commonly, colour palettes are derived from the colour wheel. But the ‘glitch’ is a radical shift in spirit and terminology. For example, for this pattern, he disassembled a digital camera and short-circuited the lens. This induces a ‘glitch’ where electronic systems are disrupted. As a result, the camera device reads the image different and produces an ‘art’ of sorts on its screen.

The compositions are unpredictable and range from pastels to vivid neons, riotous patterns and distorted imagery. As a medium to materialise the prints, Phillip did not wish to display the art on screen or generate prints from computer. He approached a photo blanket weaving service, similar to paper printing and thus ‘GlitchTextiles’ was born.

He ran a campaign on Kickstarter for GlitchTextiles to raise funds that would support his work. Post a successful campaign; he developed ‘Fragmented Memory’ at a residency in Textielmuseum’s Textiellab in Tilburg, Netherlands, in 2013. Fragmented Memory, A Triptych of Data Portraits Rendered from Raw Digital Information. Installed at the Rochester Contemporary Art Center.

Designed using a custom, hand modified digital camera. (Text from http://www.glitchtextiles.com )

The Planar Sunset was designed using 3D rendering errors (z-fighting artifacts) (Text from http://www.glitchtextiles.com )

First image [The Planar Sunset was designed using 3D rendering errors (z-fighting artifacts) (Text from http://www.glitchtextiles.com ) ]

Currently, in June 2017, Stearns has launched yet another project on Kickstarter to succeed GlitchTextiles – Computational Textiles. Funds generated will support production and development of GlitchTextiles into home decor fabrics.

But is the concept limited to aesthetics, art and beautiful visuals? Phillip Stearns has an interesting theory behind his exploration of the ‘glitch’. He says, “We use technologies to facilitate our actions, to achieve goals, and realise dreams. When these technologies fail us, when they glitch, it`s a moment for us to change our perspective and view of the world. In regards to glitches themselves, finding beauty in the unexpected is but a simple exercise in changing our bearing to the world and our experience of failure.”

AI7_20_2017_3_10_56_AM_Phillipmain.jpg
Lab 20 Jul 2017

Translating the intangible to tactile; Computational Textiles by Phillip Stearns

Phillip Stearns explores digital glitches in machines and converts them into soft warm textiles. The first digital glitch that our age may have experienced was Binary Noise or the ‘salt and pepper pattern’ when televisions did not receive signals. Phillip captures and induces glitches from cameras and digital apps to induced ‘core memory dumps’ on laptops to create interesting graphics, colour compositions and patterns.

When life gives you lemons, make lemonade! But why wait for the lemons for this realisation to dawn? The lemonade need not be an incentive of hardship neither are the lemons a source of any misery or glitch. In fact, the very idea of a ‘glitch’ is explored by Phillip Stearns through ‘GlitchTextiles’. He converts the ‘glitches’ in digital circuits into stunning graphics which eventually get woven into textiles.

Remember the salt and pattern that our television sets displayed when their antennas did not receive signal? Known as ‘binary noise’, that was probably the first digital glitch our generation experienced. Phillip Stearns creates and draws inspirations from such ‘glitches’ and weaves them into textiles!

Commonly, colour palettes are derived from the colour wheel. The colour wheel is based on the primary colours red, blue and yellow. Their overlaps create secondary colours - purple, green and orange. Their overlaps result in tertiary colours and so on. Placed next to one another on the colour wheel, these colours and their relationship with one another are used to generate colour blends.

Commonly, colour palettes are derived from the colour wheel. But the ‘glitch’ is a radical shift in spirit and terminology. For example, for this pattern, he disassembled a digital camera and short-circuited the lens. This induces a ‘glitch’ where electronic systems are disrupted. As a result, the camera device reads the image different and produces an ‘art’ of sorts on its screen.

Example –monochromes of a single hue, complementary or opposite hues, alternate hues, etc. But the ‘glitch’ is a radical shift in spirit and terminology. For example, he disassembles digital cameras and short-circuits the lens. He induces a ‘glitch’ where electronic systems are disrupted. As a result, the camera device reads the image differently and produces an ‘art’ of sorts on its screen.

The compositions are unpredictable and range from pastels to vivid neons, riotous patterns and distorted imagery. As a medium to materialise the prints, Phillip did not wish to display the art on screen or generate prints from computer. He approached a photo blanket weaving service, similar to paper printing and thus ‘GlitchTextiles’ was born.

The compositions are unpredictable and range from pastels to vivid neons, riotous patterns and distorted imagery. As a medium to materialise the prints, Phillip did not wish to display the art on screen or generate prints from computer. He approached a photo blanket weaving service, similar to paper printing and thus ‘GlitchTextiles’ was born.

“We use technologies to facilitate our actions, to achieve goals, and realise dreams. When these technologies fail us, when they glitch, it's a moment for us to change our perspective and view of the world. In regards to glitches themselves, finding beauty in the unexpected is but a simple exercise in changing our bearing to the world and our experience of failure.”

Phillip ran a successful campaign on Kickstarter for GlitchTextiles to raise funds that would support his work, post which, he developed ‘Fragmented Memory’ at a residency in Textielmuseum’s Textiellab in Tilburg, Netherlands, in 2013. Stearns extracted his computer’s physical memory in a ‘core dump’ to derive images that were woven into fabrics. Recently, in June 2017, Stearns has launched yet another project on Kickstarter to succeed GlitchTextiles – Computational Textiles. Funds generated will support its production and development into home decor fabrics.

He ran a campaign on Kickstarter for GlitchTextiles to raise funds that would support his work. Post a successful campaign; he developed ‘Fragmented Memory’ at a residency in Textielmuseum’s Textiellab in Tilburg, Netherlands, in 2013. Fragmented Memory, A Triptych of Data Portraits Rendered from Raw Digital Information. Installed at the Rochester Contemporary Art Center.

Designed using a custom, hand modified digital camera. (Text from http://www.glitchtextiles.com )

The Planar Sunset was designed using 3D rendering errors (z-fighting artifacts) (Text from http://www.glitchtextiles.com )

But is the concept limited to aesthetics, art and beautiful visuals? Phillip Stearns has an interesting theory behind his exploration of the ‘glitch’. He says, “We use technologies to facilitate our actions, to achieve goals, and realise dreams. When these technologies fail us, when they glitch, it's a moment for us to change our perspective and view of the world. In regards to glitches themselves, finding beauty in the unexpected is but a simple exercise in changing our bearing to the world and our experience of failure.”

First image [The Planar Sunset was designed using 3D rendering errors (z-fighting artifacts) (Text from http://www.glitchtextiles.com ) ]

Currently, in June 2017, Stearns has launched yet another project on Kickstarter to succeed GlitchTextiles – Computational Textiles. Funds generated will support production and development of GlitchTextiles into home decor fabrics.

But is the concept limited to aesthetics, art and beautiful visuals? Phillip Stearns has an interesting theory behind his exploration of the ‘glitch’. He says, “We use technologies to facilitate our actions, to achieve goals, and realise dreams. When these technologies fail us, when they glitch, it`s a moment for us to change our perspective and view of the world. In regards to glitches themselves, finding beauty in the unexpected is but a simple exercise in changing our bearing to the world and our experience of failure.”

By the time you read this, the Kickstarter campaign for Computational Textiles may have ended, and we hope, Phillip raised all the funds they need, and more!

 

Photo Credits:
http://www.textiellab.nl/en/news/fragmented-memory-by-phillip-stearns
http://www.glitchtextiles.com/blog/2017/6/22/kickstarter-launch-computational-textiles
https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/phillipstearns/kickstarter-gold-from-glitches-to-computational-te?ref=project_link