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Spectrum

Avinash displayed ‘Spectrum’ at an exhibition titled 1024 Names at Galleryske. Spectrum was one of the 8-pieces that were displayed at the show

Print on Satin before Crushing

Spectrum features a series of crushed satin cloth that are fit into a total of 4 frames, each measuring 70 x 95 cm, haphazardly yet signalling an order in the clutter. Understanding the importance of colours in Spectrum, Avinash explains that colour was used as an abstract metaphor representing a vast variety of personas and people of the world. He chose to display an array of vivid colours in place of a skin colour to keep away from a possible idea of division.

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Showcase 19 Apr 2017

1024 Names, Spectrum and Avinash Veeraraghavan

Avinash Veeraraghavan uses colour as a metaphor to display his views and expressions in his work, ‘Spectrum’. Crushing together pieces of fabric in a haphazard manner, Veeraraghavan talks about how each piece sources multiple references to different cultures and that when they all crush together, we look through multiplicity in unity.

Avinash Veeraraghavan, a contemporary artist from Bangalore employs an unusual direction to his work. Bracketing his work around street life and popular culture, he acknowledges a dying history and a decay in the practice of traditional crafts by the existing generation. While his finished piece may need a second look to grasp its underlying meaning, his work displays an exploration of human emotions and weighs the relationship between truth and reality.

With an informal education in art and design under Italian brothers Luigi and Andrea Anastasio, Veeraraghavan commenced his career as a designer and eventually began his own design firm ‘Beetroot’ from 1998 to 2001. While his work now focuses on digital collage and prints, he also works on graphic books, video installations and layered prints.

Speaking about ‘Layered Prints’, Avinash displayed ‘Spectrum’ at an exhibition titled 1024 Names at Galleryske. Spectrum was one of the 8-pieces that were displayed at the show. When asked what 1024 Names means, Avinash explains it as a twofold reference. One referred to the name of 1000 Hindu Gods, however to make this secular, the number 1000 was substituted with its equivalent in binary, which would count 1024. Since computers work with binary at their source, the idea of combining spirituality with technology was what Avinash deeply believed in.

Spectrum

Avinash displayed ‘Spectrum’ at an exhibition titled 1024 Names at Galleryske. Spectrum was one of the 8-pieces that were displayed at the show

 

Spectrum features a series of crushed satin cloth that are fit into a total of 4 frames, each measuring 70 x 95 cm, haphazardly yet signalling an order in the clutter. While the colour palette is chosen through specific keywords, the digital print on the satin fabric represents mood colours usually sourced through Adobe Colour, a cloud-sourced library. Understanding the importance of colours in Spectrum, Avinash explains that colour was used as an abstract metaphor representing a vast variety of personas and people of the world. He chose to display an array of vivid colours in place of a skin colour to keep away from a possible idea of division.

Print on Satin before Crushing

Spectrum features a series of crushed satin cloth that are fit into a total of 4 frames, each measuring 70 x 95 cm, haphazardly yet signalling an order in the clutter. Understanding the importance of colours in Spectrum, Avinash explains that colour was used as an abstract metaphor representing a vast variety of personas and people of the world. He chose to display an array of vivid colours in place of a skin colour to keep away from a possible idea of division.

 

Curious to know what inspired Veeraraghavan’s work and how he went about putting this digital collage together, we got his help to decode the process for us. Inspired by Japanese poster art by Tadanori Yokoo, Avinash was fascinated by his use of gradients well before the time of digital tools and Photoshop. This is when he started working with gradients. He begins by locating a specific colour palette on Adobe Colour. Having found the right match, he works on a series of gradient swatches through Photoshop composing them in simple geometric divisions of space. The high-resolution digital file is printed on a satin fabric through an inkjet printer. At this stage, the size of the print should stay larger than the size of the frame, says Veeraraghavan. To be able to frame it, the fabric pieces are crumbled down to the size of the frame. He explains, ‘This act of crushing the fabric is what deconstructs the composition and colours.’

The fabric that soaks in a myriad of colours is crushed and made to fit within the frame. The crushed fabric at this point represents an overlap and unity of cultures as well as represents a hybridity of time and culture together causing a unity in cultures.

His work documents an exploration of the very meaning of his life and the self. 1024 Names has been one of the most expressive engagement of the artist; we hope to see more from the artist.

Until then, Avinash has planned a summer show on May 13, 2017 at Galleryske, Delhi. The show would exhibit a few older pieces of the artist that haven’t been displayed in India before. Look out!