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Paolo Chiorino

We spoke to Paolo Chiorino, lead designer at Restore Design to learn about his creative inspirations. We also get a quick glimpse of one of Restore Design’s latest projects.

A photograph by Paolo Chiorino of the trees that shape his view. Living and working in Bangalore where trees are plenty, the boundless shades of green inspire him.

lush hues

For Paolo, green also comes with an assurance of quality. Its malleability with various colours and materials makes it a great choice most times. Photograph by Adam Birkett on Unsplash.

triennale di milano

Paolo’s recent visit to Milan was a refreshing one where he shot this photograph at the Triennale di Milano, known for its neat lines and balanced volumes.

Inside triennale di milano

When Paolo is not designing, he spends his time travelling across the world learning about different ways of life and design. Photograph by Paolo Chiorino.

Bar Luce designed by Wes Anderson

Distinct elements like patterned wallpapers, veneered wood wall panels and formica furniture make Bar Luce a great study for heritage meets contemporary.

Terrazzo flooring at Bar Luce

Attempting to emulate the atmosphere of Milanese cafés, Bar Luce borrows many elements from landmarks of the 1950s and 1960s in Milan.

The Facade

As a design element, Restore Design wanted to push the envelope, so they used rose aluminium composite panels to create an impactful facade.

Project Eve mood-board

The mood-board borrows colours from a makeup table including blush pink and shades of gold and gray.

A juxtaposition of various components

Elements like black and white marble, raw concrete, light wooden planks and shades of gold helped create a balance while keeping the space fresh.

The waiting area inside the trial rooms add to making the experience of shopping less tiring and more refreshing.

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Showcase 20 Sep 2017

Colour Stories: Restore Design’s Paolo Chiorino gives us a peek into his mood-board

Wondering how colours take shape in the minds of designers? From swirling in their heads to becoming colour swatches stacked on their tables, designers surely seem to stock colours in organised folders as they navigate through life. We are curious to know what these collections look like, so in this edition of Colour Stories we delve into the mood-board of one of the lead designers at Restore Design, Paolo Chiorino.

Paolo Chiorino

We spoke to Paolo Chiorino, lead designer at Restore Design to learn about his creative inspirations. We also get a quick glimpse of one of Restore Design’s latest projects.

About Restore Design

Restore Design, is a firm based in Bangalore specialising in retail design. Rated as one of ‘India’s Top 5 Design Companies', their expertise spans operations, identity and execution of every element in the retail space. Having designed stores and showrooms for some of India’s most respected brands, their portfolio includes Himalaya, Van Heusen, Zivame, Flying Machine, BBQ Nation and MTR among others. Whether it is a kiosk or a mall, the multidisciplinary team works together to create the best design solutions. In this edition of Colour Stories, CQ talks to Paolo, one of the three lead designers at the firm.

What colour inspires you?

When I design for a brand I look at many factors and then take a direction on the colours – who I am designing for, the brand colours, the composition of the space and the idea make a significant contribution towards my decision. As a personal preference, I always get inspired by contrasting elements. Lately, I’ve been interested in working with green.

A photograph by Paolo Chiorino of the trees that shape his view. Living and working in Bangalore where trees are plenty, the boundless shades of green inspire him.

“I like green because it has this quality of assurance to it. Also, it forms a great contrast with other colours and materials. It can enrich a detail or become a good neutral base in a palette to match other colours.”

Where did/do you see or observe this colour?

I have the habit of always observing what is around me to the smallest detail. I live and work in an area of Bangalore where nature is omnipresent. With so many trees around my house there are so many shades of green, especially palm trees, which shape my view. 

Why do you like it?

I like green because it has this quality of assurance to it. Also, it forms a great contrast with other colours and materials. It can enrich a detail or become a good neutral base in a palette to match other colours. But then, this is looking at a colour in isolation, which is not the right way to design. There are different factors like materials, textures, architectural decisions and mood of the space at play.

lush hues

For Paolo, green also comes with an assurance of quality. Its malleability with various colours and materials makes it a great choice most times. Photograph by Adam Birkett on Unsplash.

What is your design inspiration? A person, place or studio or any specific element?

When I am not designing, I am travelling across the world, learning about new cultures, the design habits of people from different countries and their history. I was in London last year and experienced some ethereal design elements that were a great source of inspiration for my next project. My recent visit to Milan was also a refreshing one, especially the time I spent in Triennale di Milano and Fondazione Prada.

triennale di milano

Paolo’s recent visit to Milan was a refreshing one where he shot this photograph at the Triennale di Milano, known for its neat lines and balanced volumes.

Inside triennale di milano

When Paolo is not designing, he spends his time travelling across the world learning about different ways of life and design. Photograph by Paolo Chiorino.

A little about Triennale di Milano

Triennale di Milano is a design and art museum located at Milan, Lombardy in northern Italy. The museum is housed in the Palazzo dell’Arte, known for its neat lines and balanced volumes designed by Giovanni Muzio. Home to temporary and permanent exhibitions through the year, main highlights often include contemporary Italian design, architecture, music and urban planning with a focus on the relationship between industry, art and society. 

What is the work that is your design inspiration?

Bar Luce in Fondazione Prada is a visual treat to the eyes. It has been designed by Wes Anderson and is a tribute to the 50s and 60s Milanese cafés and bars. While it takes its roots from the golden years, it has various elements like laminates, flooring, wallpapers and furniture used in a current way. I like how Wes Anderson has created a perfect blend of heritage and contemporary elements.

Bar Luce designed by Wes Anderson

Distinct elements like patterned wallpapers, veneered wood wall panels and formica furniture make Bar Luce a great study for heritage meets contemporary.

Terrazzo flooring at Bar Luce

Attempting to emulate the atmosphere of Milanese cafés, Bar Luce borrows many elements from landmarks of the 1950s and 1960s in Milan.

A peek into Bar Luce

Attempting to emulate the atmosphere of Milanese cafés, Bar Luce borrows many elements from landmarks of the 1950s and 1960s in Milan. Designed by film director Wes Anderson who is renowned to favour symmetrical compositions and pastel colours, the bar incorporates decorative details like patterned wallpaper, veneered wood wall panels, a terrazzo floor and formica furniture while preserving original structures such as the arched ceiling. Anderson is said to have been influenced by two masterpieces of Italian Neorealism set in Milan: Miracolo a Milano, 1951 and Rocco e i suoi fratelli, 1960. Bar Luce is the latest of several collaborations between Prada and Andersen, including commercials and short films. 

“But then, this is looking at a colour in isolation, which is not the right way to design. There are different factors like materials, textures, architectural decisions and mood of the space at play.”

If we were to showcase any one of your recent projects, which one would it be?

It would be Project Eve, one of our latest projects at Restore Design for Reliance Retail. An all-women’s store, they have already opened two outlets, one in Mumbai and one in Bengaluru and are looking at Pan-India expansion for the next few years.

The Facade

As a design element, Restore Design wanted to push the envelope, so they used rose aluminium composite panels to create an impactful facade.

The Mood-board for Project Eve

We thought of a makeup table while deciding the colours and materials. The brand colour itself borrows from the colour of blush. We also created a neutral palette comprising of light shades of white and gray, with graphite black highlights. Elements like black and white marble, raw concrete, light wooden planks and shades of gold helped create a balance while keeping the space fresh.

Project Eve mood-board

The mood-board borrows colours from a makeup table including blush pink and shades of gold and gray.

As a design element, we wanted to push the envelope, so we used rose aluminium composite panels to create an impactful facade. We wanted to step away from using the logo as a flat background. So when you look at the huge facade of the Project Eve store in Jayanagar, the rose elements are always angled and twisted, representing the multiple facets of a woman.

A juxtaposition of various components

Elements like black and white marble, raw concrete, light wooden planks and shades of gold helped create a balance while keeping the space fresh.

The waiting area inside the trial rooms add to making the experience of shopping less tiring and more refreshing.

Browse through Restore Design’s other projects here.
Keep up with Paolo Chiorino’s creative inspirations here.
More Colour Stories, here.