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Chip[s] Board

This is the new and most exciting potato by-product since french fries! Made from potato waste, the material is similar to medium density fiberboard (MDF) or chipboard and can be used as a biodegradable alternative.

Rust Harvest

Yuma Kano`s “Rust Harvest” changes the narrative surrounding the corrosive natural phenomenon.

Rust Harvest by Yuma Kano

Being able to appreciate its aesthetic merits, designer Yuma Kano was able to transfer rust from metal surfaces to acrylic, preserving its visual attributes in transparent panels.

Husk, made from Rice Husk

This range of tiles, properly titled “Husk” uses agricultural waste leftover from the rice milling process to create textured surface finishes in a variety of vivid patterns

Biocellulose, by Yoko Shimizu

Japanese artist and biotechnologist, Yoko Shimizu, was able to combine art and science by cultivating her own design materials.

Yoko Shimizu`s experiments

Her installation series “Biocellulose” uses microbes, usually used in scientific and industrial processes, to create thin translucent fibres of cellulose that can be pressed to resemble paper and textiles.

ecoBirdy

Committed to social and environmental change, Antwerp-based company ecoBirdy collects and recycles plastic toys and turns them into contemporary children’s furniture.

ecoBirdy

The past year saw the company being the recipient of several awards such as, Australia Good Design Award for “Outstanding Design and Innovation”, Blickfang Design Preis 2018, and German Design Award for “Product Design”.

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Showcase 06 Dec 2018

CQ Round-up: 5 Innovative Materials That Blew our Minds in 2018

A look back at some of the most notable material explorations that CQ came across this past year. From potatoes to plastic, 2018 saw new materials developed and existing ones reinvented.

To reimagine a material is to introduce a wave of new possibilities and opportunities. Whether in terms of implementing sustainable or eco-conscious features, or changing how a substance or matter is contextualised, experiments in material development can impact societies, economic sectors and the environment at large. These are some of the most promising new materials set to shake things up.

Chip[s] Board

This is the new and most exciting potato by-product since french fries! Made from potato waste, the material is similar to medium density fiberboard (MDF) or chipboard and can be used as a biodegradable alternative.

1. Chip[s] Board

Chip[s] Board is the new and most exciting potato by-product since french fries. Made from potato waste, the material is similar to medium density fiberboard (MDF) or chipboard and can be used as a biodegradable alternative. Chip[s] Board founders Rowan Minkley, Robert Nicoll and Gregory Cooper intend to make the eco-friendly product an easily accessible and industrially viable material, reducing environmental damage as they do so. In need of Slatwall Panels? New kitchen cabinets? Temporary stage sets? There's potatoes for that. Read up on their story here.

Rust Harvest

Yuma Kano`s “Rust Harvest” changes the narrative surrounding the corrosive natural phenomenon.

Rust Harvest by Yuma Kano

Being able to appreciate its aesthetic merits, designer Yuma Kano was able to transfer rust from metal surfaces to acrylic, preserving its visual attributes in transparent panels.

2. Rust Harvest

Getting rid of the rust that has formed on the products in and around your home is a waste of perfectly good rust. Being able to appreciate its aesthetic merits, designer Yuma Kano was able to transfer rust from metal surfaces to acrylic, preserving its visual attributes in transparent panels. This resulted in a new experimental material, easy to use and manipulate, with seemingly endless design-related possibilities. Yuma Kano's “Rust Harvest” changes the narrative surrounding the corrosive natural phenomenon. Check out the process behind the series here.

Husk, made from Rice Husk

This range of tiles, properly titled “Husk” uses agricultural waste leftover from the rice milling process to create textured surface finishes in a variety of vivid patterns

3. Husk by Sonite

As if we needed another reason to like rice, Thai company Sonite has come up with a series of earth-tone mosaic tiles created out of rice husk. The range of tiles, properly titled “Husk” uses agricultural waste leftover from the rice milling process to create textured surface finishes in a variety of vivid patterns such as Madison and Herringbone. While the brown shell encasing rice serves a variety of purposes, they're hardly ever used in décor or contribute aesthetically. Learn more about Sonite and their eco-conscious tiles here.

Biocellulose, by Yoko Shimizu

Japanese artist and biotechnologist, Yoko Shimizu, was able to combine art and science by cultivating her own design materials.

Yoko Shimizu`s experiments

Her installation series “Biocellulose” uses microbes, usually used in scientific and industrial processes, to create thin translucent fibres of cellulose that can be pressed to resemble paper and textiles.

4. Biocellulose

Japanese artist and biotechnologist, Yoko Shimizu, was able to combine art and science by cultivating her own design materials. Her installation series “Biocellulose” uses microbes, usually used in scientific and industrial processes, to create thin translucent fibres of cellulose that can be pressed to resemble paper and textiles. Fibres of high mechanical strength require an optimal environment and, once produced, are versatile to accommodate various uses. So what does all this about cellulose, microbes, cultivation and art really mean? Find out here.

ecoBirdy

Committed to social and environmental change, Antwerp-based company ecoBirdy collects and recycles plastic toys and turns them into contemporary children’s furniture.

ecoBirdy

The past year saw the company being the recipient of several awards such as, Australia Good Design Award for “Outstanding Design and Innovation”, Blickfang Design Preis 2018, and German Design Award for “Product Design”.

5. ecoBirdy

You can sit on doing something with those old plastic toys you have lying around, or you can sit on them literally. Committed to social and environmental change, Antwerp-based company ecoBirdy collects and recycles plastic toys and turns them into contemporary children’s furniture. The past year saw the company being the recipient of several awards such as, Australia Good Design Award for “Outstanding Design and Innovation”, Blickfang Design Preis 2018, and German Design Award for “Product Design”. In addition to the minimal line, the company is currently doing its part to introduce children to ecological concepts by designing and implementing an entire educational system. More about the ecoBirdy movement here.

That's it for 2018 and our line-up of weird, crazy, important material developments! More in 2019...crazier perhaps. Check out our round-up for 2018, here.