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Curators of Clay, a clay-based business

Not your regular design studio, Curators of Clay is best described as a pursuit of happiness, beauty and peace, with handcrafted ceramics being their medium of choice.

ADITI ORGANICS OFFICE BY MADE IN EARTH, BENGALURU

Finished in clay or lime, pallet wood-slats, glass, and even exposed fired bricks - The ADITI Organics Office is a choreography of much-loved materials at the studio..

Jon Almeda`s Miniatures

Jon Almeda’s miniature ceramics, typically follow a one-inch scale and are fully-finished pieces boasting different colours and textures.

THE ARTIST – SEJAL MODY

Sejal Mody at work for an art exhibition in Jaipur.

Ignorance is Bliss by Agne Kucerenkaite

Through broad scale research, Agne has figured out exactly how much pigment to add to get the colour she wants. Colours remain earthy when the presence of iron is high in all the samples.

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Showcase 17 Dec 2018

CQ Round-up: Some of the most fascinating mud-driven works of 2018

From ceramics to architecture, mud is used in different fields in a variety of creative ways and in various forms. CQ rounds-up a list of stories where studios and designers use mud for their work in 2018.

Mud is literally everywhere. On the ground, in museums, in stores, holding our food and drinks, in health and cosmetic products and much more. Odds are there is something mud-related in your home right now. In some cultures and regions, the homes themselves are made of mud. Entire projects are built around earth and its properties. We’ve compiled a list of some of these projects that approach mud in non-traditional ways – from the articles we featured in 2018.

1. Curators of Clay

Do you ever find yourself daydreaming about quitting your job and moving to the countryside? Rohit Kulkarni and Bhairavi Naik did just that. Together, they founded Curators of Clay, a small ceramic studio in Bhugaon where they create handcrafted tableware and homeware. Their products are microwaveable, dishwasher safe and, most importantly, instagramable. Described as “a pursuit of happiness, beauty, and peace”, Curators of Clay produces minimalist works in muted and earthy tones, in-studio and by the founders themselves. Unless for some reason you don't like happiness or beauty, you'll probably enjoy learning more about their business.

Curators of Clay, a clay-based business

Not your regular design studio, Curators of Clay is best described as a pursuit of happiness, beauty and peace, with handcrafted ceramics being their medium of choice.

Curators of Clay, here.

 

2. Made in Earth

The Bengaluru office of ADITI Organics was designed by Made in Earth, an environmentally-conscious architecture studio and construction practice that specialises in using earth to create contemporary architectural pieces. They believe in practicing architecture “with an understanding of the soil on which it exists”. They were able to transform the empty space into an escape from typical urban environments, using a range of materials including their signature clay and lime mix.

ADITI ORGANICS OFFICE BY MADE IN EARTH, BENGALURU

Finished in clay or lime, pallet wood-slats, glass, and even exposed fired bricks - The ADITI Organics Office is a choreography of much-loved materials at the studio..

Take a look at the eco-friendly office here.

 

3. Jon Almeda

You may have come across Jon Almeda’s massively popular Instagram where he shares time-lapse videos in which he transforms mounds of clay into these sought-after works. It’s not surprising that his videos are so popular given the ability of pottery videos to hypnotize viewers and put them in a trance. Jon’s work, however, has another, more prominent, attention-grabbing feature – his largest pieces are only an inch tall. All his works are highly detailed, fully finished and small. Really small.

Jon Almeda`s Miniatures

Jon Almeda’s miniature ceramics, typically follow a one-inch scale and are fully-finished pieces boasting different colours and textures.

More about Jon Almeda’s little pots here.

 

4. Sejal Mody

After going through a creative rut, Mumbai-based Sejal Mody was inspired to focus on earth, after a one-month stint at Andretta Pottery in Himachal Pradesh. Sejal works with mud and is constantly working to learn more about the medium and how it can be harnessed. The qualities of mud vary from location to location, and so, there’s always more to learn. One gets the sense that she doesn't so much create with mud but rather, she discovers what it can do. Pushing the boundaries of what mud can do has resulted in the creation of jewelry, furniture, murals and more.

THE ARTIST – SEJAL MODY

Sejal Mody at work for an art exhibition in Jaipur.

Take a look at some of her work here.

 

5. Ignorance is Bliss

Much to the distress of every aunty in those detergent commercials, that are oddly invested in other people’s laundry needs, Agne Kucerenkaite thinks dirt and cloth go perfectly well together. To be clear, she believes metallic waste found in soil around factories can be used to colour, not just cloth, but ceramics and glass as well. As demonstrated in her ongoing project “Ignorance is Bliss”, Agne has perfected using the often toxic metallic waste for the pigmentation of several products including mugs, rugs, and tiles. Get to know more about her work and its environmental implications here.

Ignorance is Bliss by Agne Kucerenkaite

Through broad scale research, Agne has figured out exactly how much pigment to add to get the colour she wants. Colours remain earthy when the presence of iron is high in all the samples.

Those are our 5 top mud-driven works of 2018. Check out other round-ups for the year, here.