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VIVID PRINTS

Chosen as one of the `20 names to know` by Elle magazine, Kangan’s approach is typified by bold and vibrant prints.

CITY AS INSPIRATION FOR THE OFFICE GROUP

The inspiration for Kangan Arora’s work for The Office Group came from Bristol city. She drew inspiration from Bristol’s urban language - manhole covers, railings, road markings, street architecture, etc. and explored them through abstraction and repetition.

BEDDING FOR URBAN OUTFITTERS

Scale was an essential element while designing bedding, amongst other products. The concept of choosing squares sprung from the idea of introducing irregularity and chaos to an orderly repetition.

REN COLLABORATION

While REN’s colour palette is quite subtle and pastel, Kangan’s work tends to gravitate towards the bolder end of the spectrum with a bit of neon. Kangan designed the mail order packaging with the opposite approach - monochrome on the outside and a colour block surprise on the inside.

CONSTANT LOVE FOR SHAPES

Designing with shapes has been an ongoing theme in most of Kangan’s work.

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Showcase 06 Jul 2018

Elements: Patterns. Inspired by two different cultures, surface pattern designer Kangan Arora creates bold, unusual patterns for global brands

In the midst of mundane, we often come across mind-bending patterns wherein the negative space, also known as breathing space, and colour palettes create moments of joy and celebration. This is the space that Kangan Arora, founder of the London-based eponymous design studio, operates in. Chosen as one of the '20 names to know' by Elle magazine, Kangan’s approach is typified by bold and vibrant prints. Her designs have also been showcased at the V&A Museum, Southbank Centre and Milan Triennale Design Museum. We speak to Kangan about some of her recent work for Urban Outfitters, The Office Group and REN – stories of similar patterns with wildly different contexts.

VIVID PRINTS

Chosen as one of the `20 names to know` by Elle magazine, Kangan’s approach is typified by bold and vibrant prints.

Narrative of the colour and patterns for The Office Group project.

Kangan Arora was given the task of creating acoustic panels for meeting rooms in The Office Group's Bristol outpost, St Nicholas House. The inspiration for her work for this project came from observing Bristol city. Kangan explains, “It is The Office Group’s first building in Bristol and I had a specific brief – to take inspiration from the city, its street art and graphic design scene. I started by looking at Bristol’s urban language: manhole covers, railings, road markings, street architecture, etc. And then explored these ideas through abstraction and repetition.”

CITY AS INSPIRATION FOR THE OFFICE GROUP

The inspiration for Kangan Arora’s work for The Office Group came from Bristol city. She drew inspiration from Bristol’s urban language - manhole covers, railings, road markings, street architecture, etc. and explored them through abstraction and repetition.


This was a site-specific project and the end result was to be both aesthetically pleasing and functional, doubling as artwork and acoustic panels for their meeting rooms. For the final production, Kangan screen-printed the patterns on a heavy-weight wool fabric from a Danish textile company called Kvadrat. The resultant fabric showcased a slightly raised and embossed effect that was reminiscent of the tactility of well-worn and painted road markings.

Story behind the shapes for the Urban Outfitters project

For Urban Outfitters, Kangan worked on an exclusive collection of bed linen and cushions, featuring pastel colours and lively patterns. Talking about the project, Kangan says, “Geometry, overlapping, layering, and repetition heavily influence my work, with colour often being the most important element.” The concept of choosing squares for Urban Outfitters sprung from the idea of introducing irregularity and chaos to an orderly repetition. Designing with shapes, in fact, has been an ongoing theme in most of her work. And, unlike her other projects, scale was an extremely essential element to keep in mind as she was designing bedding, amongst other smaller products.

BEDDING FOR URBAN OUTFITTERS

Scale was an essential element while designing bedding, amongst other products. The concept of choosing squares sprung from the idea of introducing irregularity and chaos to an orderly repetition.

Exploring colour through the graphic representation for REN Skincare’s Christmas and mail packaging

For global skincare brand REN, Kangan had to design their 2016 Christmas gift packaging. Being her first packaging project, the REN collaboration was a novelty to her. To savour pattern and colour in a three-dimensional manner rather than a flat textile surface was a great experience for her, she feels.

REN COLLABORATION

While REN’s colour palette is quite subtle and pastel, Kangan’s work tends to gravitate towards the bolder end of the spectrum with a bit of neon. Kangan designed the mail order packaging with the opposite approach - monochrome on the outside and a colour block surprise on the inside.

Inspired by American minimalist artists, Sol LeWitt and Donald Judd, Kangan worked with simple shapes and stripes to create fun graphic patterns and geometric shapes in a more painterly and organic manner to complement one another – all as a result of mark making, collage and drawing. She discussed the act of receiving a gift with the team at REN at length – from the first impression to gradually discovering small, thoughtful details.  She then placed small inspirational messages with the contents of the box, that reveal themselves while pulling out the silk tag in the package to open it. The idea was to turn the box into a collectible.

Geometry, overlapping, layering and repetition heavily influence my work with colour often being the most important element.

While REN’s colour palette is quite subtle and pastel, Kangan’s work tends to gravitate towards the bolder end of the spectrum with a bit of neon. The contrasting results worked superbly to create a fresh colour palette with just the right amount of fluorescence for the festive season.

To twist and continue the longevity of its design regardless of trends and seasons, Kangan designed the mail order packaging with the opposite approach - monochrome on the outside and a colour block surprise on the inside whilst continuing the same graphic language of the Christmas sets.

CONSTANT LOVE FOR SHAPES

Designing with shapes has been an ongoing theme in most of Kangan’s work.

You can learn more about Kangan’s process and projects through her Instagram account and website.