AI11_8_2017_11_03_31_PM_featuredoption1.jpg
Patterns galore at IDAM

First in a mini-series on patterns, we learn more about surface and pattern design studio IDAM’s process.

Seeing doodled dreams through

From just car ride discussions, Nayanika and Gazal fused their love for everything textile and design to create a studio entirely focused on producing hand illustrated and hand printed patterned products for homes across the globe.

Making the Motifs

Their process often starts with motif development as they set the tone for the rest of the pattern. Placing it differently and scaling it is one of their favourite parts of the process.

Doodled motifs turn into collections

Their designs attempt to give us a glimpse into their daily escapades. Often, motifs borrow from objects like fallen leaves that are commonplace, but don’t get a second glance.

Transitional collections

IDAM believes that designing for the home requires design that remains fresh for longer periods as they aren’t changed that frequently. They hope to amalgamate traditional and trendy.

Collaboration, colour and character

Key to IDAM is a burst of colour, collaboration between Nayanika and Gazal as well as the craftspeople and characters that bring each collection to life and take beyond motifs, turning them into stories.

Try and Tuck

Trial is a constant part of the pattern making process whether it is deciding colour palettes, textures or even surface techniques. Nayanika and Gazal often experiment with various techniques like pintucks and ruffles in order to finally decide the direction they are heading in.

Borrowing from Panchatantra

Revisiting childhood bedtime stories that featured many animals, IDAM’s latest collection is a part of their new venture into products for children - IDAM little.

Printing the pattern

Nayanika and Gazal believe scale is really critical to pattern design, so analysing prints once they’re back from the printers is an important part of deciding the final aesthetics, required handwork and trims.

AI11_8_2017_11_03_31_PM_featuredoption1.jpg
Showcase 08 Nov 2017

Elements: Patterns. Prints in plenty at the pattern and surface design studio, IDAM

You’ve probably found yourself being inexplicably drawn towards patterns, whether they’re motifs you treasure, or shapes you tend to find pleasing. From the tessellations of honeycombs and stripes on zebras to scales on pineapples and veins on leaves – equipped with order, rhythm and repetition, patterns provide a refreshing dash of predictability amidst the chaos. Captivated by patterns and their usage across products, textiles and design, we curiously approached a few people and brands that specifically focus on pattern making as an important part of their practice. The first in this curated mini-series on patterns is IDAM, a surface and pattern design studio in India.

Triangles, geometric lines, a burst of colours and hues of the ocean are just some of the elements that might instantly catch your eye from IDAM’s assorted product range. Spanning dots, floral prints, ikat interpretations and distressed prints, the pattern and surface design studio has taken hand-drawn doodles a notch higher with their collections. Born out of multiple car ride discussions and plans to and from college, Nayanika and Gazal took their common love for doodling, patterning and colouring and turned it into a design studio.

Patterns galore at IDAM

First in a mini-series on patterns, we learn more about surface and pattern design studio IDAM’s process.

Seeing doodled dreams through

From just car ride discussions, Nayanika and Gazal fused their love for everything textile and design to create a studio entirely focused on producing hand illustrated and hand printed patterned products for homes across the globe.

 

Fusing their dreams and doodles

The smallest elements when composed in meaningful ways have the ability to create magical arrangements. Nayanika and Gazal take this understanding forward through their designs. Speaking about the allure for patterns they say, “Patterns are all around us. It is fascinating how one motif can create various patterns by just being placed differently across a canvas.”

Making the Motifs

Their process often starts with motif development as they set the tone for the rest of the pattern. Placing it differently and scaling it is one of their favourite parts of the process.

 

In fact Nayanika, an alumni of NIFT, New Delhi has always been a pattern fanatic given her eye for printmaking and textile & surface explorations. Gazal, who is also a NIFT graduate brings in her love for everything hand-drawn, crafted and quirky along with her graphic design know-how to the brand. 

From fallen leaves outside the IDAM studio to folk art that is present in every nook and cranny across the country, they bring careful observations of their surroundings to the canvas while designing. Elaborating on how balance remains key to patterning, they express, “Ensuring that the pattern is balanced in terms of colour and depth are two of the most important lessons we have learnt.”

Doodled motifs turn into collections

Their designs attempt to give us a glimpse into their daily escapades. Often, motifs borrow from objects like fallen leaves that are commonplace, but don’t get a second glance.

 

“It is only when we get the prints back that we decide on the trims and overall aesthetic.”

Of processing patterns into prints 

Whether it is an ode to Marrakech in their ‘Lost in Marrakesh’ collection or a celebration of Sozni embroidery from Jammu and Kashmir in their ‘Sozani’ collection, each collection moves past colours and fabric to weave a narrative about the places Nayanika and Gazal turn to, when looking for inspiration.

Transitional collections

IDAM believes that designing for the home requires design that remains fresh for longer periods as they aren’t changed that frequently. They hope to amalgamate traditional and trendy.

 

Making patterns at IDAM begins with keeping a constant track of trends and magazines. Merging these observations with bits from their daily experiences, they build a moodboard and colour palette to reference while creating motifs and textures. However, before they work on illustrations, they spend time playing with surface techniques and experimenting with possibilities from pintucks to ruffles. For instance the ‘Sozani Dhurrie’, a warm thick cotton rug that is a part of their ‘Sozani’ collection is made with 256 hand-tucked tassels, specially crafted over four days by Promila, a handwork artisan they work with.

Collaboration, colour and character

Key to IDAM is a burst of colour, collaboration between Nayanika and Gazal as well as the craftspeople and characters that bring each collection to life and take beyond motifs, turning them into stories.

 

Along with craft, crucial to the entire process is seeing all the illustrations, ideas and designs come to life on fabric when freshly printed panels return from the printers. “It is only when we get the prints back that we decide on the trims and overall aesthetic,” they say, explaining that scale is critical to pattern design since patterns have the ability to completely transform spaces, either by creating boundaries or opening them up.

Try and Tuck

Trial is a constant part of the pattern making process whether it is deciding colour palettes, textures or even surface techniques. Nayanika and Gazal often experiment with various techniques like pintucks and ruffles in order to finally decide the direction they are heading in.

 

“Patterns are all around us. It is fascinating how one motif can create various patterns by just being placed differently across a canvas.”

Storytelling through interaction 

Nayanika and Gazal’s latest adventure is their entry into a range for kids, IDAM little in collaboration with applique handwork by Raiman, a fashion label. Taking their love for telling tales forward, they are borrowing a leaf from the evergreen Panchatantra stories for their ‘Mrigaatha’ collection.

Borrowing from Panchatantra

Revisiting childhood bedtime stories that featured many animals, IDAM’s latest collection is a part of their new venture into products for children - IDAM little.

An ancient Indian collection of stories, the tales often featured animals and narrative in verse and prose. The idea is to connect and interact with children using their everyday surroundings, whether that is the clothes they wear, the toys they spend their days with or the pillows they sleep on.

Printing the pattern

Nayanika and Gazal believe scale is really critical to pattern design, so analysing prints once they’re back from the printers is an important part of deciding the final aesthetics, required handwork and trims.

 

Launching on Children’s Day, 14 November, the collection hopes that children will not only have beautiful and bright spaces coloured by riveting patterns, but also animals that they can befriend. IDAM understands that home is intrinsically linked to many of our memories, thereby ensuring that their designs are not only trendy, or traditional, but a seamless transition between the two.

 

For a glimpse into IDAM’s latest collections, follow them on Instagram or browse their website.