Fluid_main.jpg
Rajat Sodhi

Light is split into pairs of complementary colours by dichroic film sheets.

Installation seen from different angles shows the changing interplay of colours.

Senthil Kumar Doss

The white shades and translucency of Indian marble brings a sense of softness to the space.

The computer aided design helps create spaces to envelop and engage the observer.

Different lighting conditions bring out the textures and veins of the marble

Fluid_main.jpg
Showcase 30 Jun 2015

Fluid Forms

Fluid Forms is about freedom and flexibility. It signifies spaces, designs, and colours that transition from one to the other with ease.

RAJAT SODHI

Co-founder, Orproject 

Rajat Sodhi

Light is split into pairs of complementary colours by dichroic film sheets.

Rajat Sodhi received his diploma from the Architectural Association in London in 2007 and his Masters in Architecture in Parametric Urbanism at the Design Research Lab in 2009. His interest lies in developing computational geometry and exploring material formations inspired by nature’s inherent optimisations. 

In 2006, Rajat Sodhi co-founded Orproject, seeking to explore advanced geometries, and the integration of natural elements into design.  The firm’s projects range from experimental and small-scale installations to large real estate developments.

  • Client: Delhi Duty Free Services Pvt. Ltd. 
  • Year of Completion: 2013 
  • Project: Lehar 
  • Area: 725 ft2
  • Location: New Delhi

About The Project

The client approached us with a brief that specified an iconic looking, light weight-structure over part of the existing Delhi Duty Free shop. Since this was in the India themed section of the airport, they required a design that would make a unique statement about India and attract customers from afar, yet be unobtrusive to the sales experience. 

As designers we felt that the Indian experience of the Duty Free area should be supplemented with dynamic colours in a fluid form. We proposed the use of dichroic sheets that change colours as the user walks across the space—highlighting both the dynamism and richness of the Indian cultural experience. 

The form of the undulating sheets on the ceiling is computationally derived from the way waves move across the ocean’s surface. The dynamics of this wave motion are enhanced by the movement of the colours across the sheets as the user walks around and under the installation.

Installation seen from different angles shows the changing interplay of colours.

Material and Colour

Dichroic sheets are available in sets of complementary colours—from cyan to dark red, green to magenta, pink to teal, yellow to blue and so on. We felt that the colour palette from yellow to blue complemented the existing colours in the shop space, and added a hint of drama to the ceiling. 2mm acrylic sheets were laminated with dichroic film, laser cut with notches to allow sheets to pass across one another. The entire installation was suspended from the ceiling using dry wall anchors to avoid using aluminium channel supports behind the plaster board ceiling.

Colour is integral to materiality and enhances the tectonics of form. It is an integral part of a material and not an applied layer. When light bounces off the natural colour of a material, it enhances the space with the spirit of that material.

SENTHIL KUMAR DOSS

Principal Architect and Founder, Play Architecture

Senthil Kumar Doss

The white shades and translucency of Indian marble brings a sense of softness to the space.

Senthil Kumar Doss has been practicing architecture since 1999 with his professional career beginning at Brand New Day, an experimental design studio at Auroville, India. He founded Play Architecture in 2005 and began his career as an academician at R.V School of Architecture, Bangalore and conducted lectures, design and material workshops, at various architecture and design organisations in India. 

Most recently Senthil Kumar Doss has presented papers on ‘Sketches to Scripting’ to be published by Manipal International Symposium on Design at Dubai. An ardent student of martial arts, he has begun research works to understand and establish relationship in techniques involving architecture and martial arts.

  • Client: AQB Motors 
  • Year of Completion: 2011 
  • Project: Design of a showroom for high-end used cars 
  • Area: 3500 ft2
  • Location: Bangalore, Karnataka

About The Project

AQB Motors’ dream was to have a display space of international standards, which was experimental and questioned the conventional idea of a showroom, and to create a new identity for display of high-end used cars. 

Visitors to a showroom need to be effortlessly engrossed in the object they are observing, until they are ‘jerked’ away, to look at something else. This is a nonlinear process, and requires a conducive environment. Parametric design, a method  of computer aided design based on intelligent algorithms was explored as a unique way to address this challenge of engrossing the viewer in a new way. 

A continuous spline was drawn around the objects for display and was further extruded vertically to gauge the resultant spatial impact. The three-dimensional form thus achieved was twisted in all three axis forming a faceted geometric form along the length of the spline. A conscious effort was made to allow intuition to take over from digital and technology driven processes, which allowed the craftsmen to participate in the creative process. 

AQB Motors’ intent explores the idea of fluid forms expressed visually through fragments, a principle similar to construction of a circle using multiple points. The fluidity symbolises the dynamics of these new age machines and techniques. With computer programs and rapid prototyping easing the process, the future of design is tending more and more towards exploration of such spaces and forms. Such explorations will soon lead to a paradigm shift in terms of our behavioural patterns, acceptance and adaptation to such non-linear spaces, altering the way we might think and live in the future. 

This project explores the idea of translucency and lightness without being decorative through the choice and use of unconventional exercises of form and material selection. Each space transforms and reads differently as the lighting changes at various times of the day. The artificial lighting also strongly contributes to the spatial dynamics as the spaces could be lit differently for different occasions, making the space behave like a chameleon by changing colour and texture according to its surroundings. 

Different lighting conditions bring out the textures and veins of the marble

Material and Colour

Selecting a material makes or breaks any project. A library of products ranging from acrylic and polycarbonate to metal meshes sandwiched with glass were considered before choosing Indian marble. The various shades and textures of white enhanced the vibrancy of the surroundings, while the marble brought the softness and the translucency to the space. Once lit, the whole space begins to glow bringing out the textures and veins of the stone. The colour and texture in areas other than marble were chosen carefully from the tones coming from the natural stone itself to make the surfaces look as seamless as possible.

 

IMAGES


RAJAT SODHI

• All images courtesy Orproject

 

SENTHIL KUMAR DOSS

• All images courtesy Play Architecture