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Ranganath Krishnamani

He feels that the inspiration for this series subconsciously started at art school where he practiced sketching everyday by heading to local markets to study people going on with their lives.

Gangamma`s cart

The breakthrough for the series happened recently when he started to create `Gangamma`s cart` which he would frequent almost every day from work to take a break.

Seenappa`s cart

“I always noticed these colorful carts during my commute, perched on some of the busiest streets – often with great handwritten type, innovative color schemes, and distinctive lighting to make them stand out in the crowd.”

Manju`s cart

One of the most interesting aspects for Ranganath while creating this series was his conversations with the cart owners to know about their backgrounds and stories.

Murugan`s cart

Scooping out slices of the city he inhabits and using them in his works is an essential part of Ranganath’s portfolio.

Nekhram`s cart

“The thought of rushing out to the streets upon their arrival is truly nostalgic. Growing up in Bangalore, the street that we lived in Malleswaram was frequented by several cart vendors who would pass by with a unique call for action which always piqued my imagination."

Hanumanthappa`s cart

"Hanumanthappa, for instance, has been selling tender coconuts for 20 years now – the only trade his father taught him."

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Showcase 13 Jun 2018

Looking Beyond: Ranganath Krishnamani puts a spotlight on the ubiquitous, quintessential pushcarts of India

“It's not called the wheel, it's called the carousel. It lets us travel the way a child travels - around and around, and back home again, to a place where we know are loved.” – a famous TV character once said this while talking about nostalgia. Bangalore-based multi-disciplinary designer and founder of Liquidink Design, Ranganath Krishnamani, has personified this sublime notion in his series ‘Indian Pushcarts’. In this project, Ranganath focuses on the ubiquitous and quintessential thelas (Pushcarts) of India that form an intricate part of our daily lives, especially during childhood.

Memories of Childhood

“The thought of rushing out to the streets upon their arrival is truly nostalgic. Growing up in Bangalore, the street that we lived in Malleswaram was frequented by several cart vendors who would pass by with a unique call for action which always piqued my imagination. And I would run out to see what they had to offer, which ranged from flowers to vegetables to street food like ice golas and flavorful chaat,” reminisces Ranganath. 

Ranganath Krishnamani

He feels that the inspiration for this series subconsciously started at art school where he practiced sketching everyday by heading to local markets to study people going on with their lives.

He feels that the inspiration for this series subconsciously started at art school where he practiced sketching everyday by heading to local markets to study people going on with their lives. However, the breakthrough for the series happened recently when he started to create 'Gangamma's cart' which he would frequent almost every day from work to take a break. “I always noticed these colourful carts during my commute, perched on some of the busiest streets – often with great handwritten type, innovative colour schemes, and distinctive lighting to make them stand out in the crowd. I always wondered what really motivated these people to come to work everyday and to survive the hustle of the street life.” 

Gangamma`s cart

The breakthrough for the series happened recently when he started to create `Gangamma`s cart` which he would frequent almost every day from work to take a break.

“I have watched Bangalore transition from a slow pensioner’s paradise known for its laid-back culture, gardens, vintage architecture and great street food to a fast-paced, global intellectual capital – the Silicon Valley of India.

Learning the Backstories

One of the most interesting aspects for Ranganath while creating this series turned out to be his conversations with the cart owners about their backgrounds and stories. “It was humbling to hear their experiences and their hustle to come to a big town like Bangalore to start their own business. Interacting with them, one can instantly observe the perseverance and time they have put into making this their profession. Hanumanthappa, for instance, has been selling tender coconuts for 20 years now – the only trade his father taught him. Senappa, a bangle seller, has been in the trade for more than 25 years. Some of these pushcarts have grown so popular in the communities that they have now become landmarks.”  

Seenappa`s cart

“I always noticed these colorful carts during my commute, perched on some of the busiest streets – often with great handwritten type, innovative color schemes, and distinctive lighting to make them stand out in the crowd.”

Hanumanthappa`s cart

"Hanumanthappa, for instance, has been selling tender coconuts for 20 years now – the only trade his father taught him."

Manju`s cart

One of the most interesting aspects for Ranganath while creating this series was his conversations with the cart owners to know about their backgrounds and stories.

The City as a Muse

Scooping out slices of the city he inhabits and using them in his works is an essential part of Ranganath’s portfolio. He says, “I have watched Bangalore transition from a slow pensioner’s paradise known for its laid-back culture, gardens, vintage architecture and great street food to a fast-paced, global intellectual capital – the Silicon Valley of India. I guess the charm and nostalgia of the city can still be experienced in the vintage architecture that has stood the test of time and represents an era. However, today’s fast moving life doesn’t allow for these teleportation into the past where life was simple. I look at it as a great way to understand more about my city.”

Murugan`s cart

Scooping out slices of the city he inhabits and using them in his works is an essential part of Ranganath’s portfolio.

Nekhram`s cart

“The thought of rushing out to the streets upon their arrival is truly nostalgic. Growing up in Bangalore, the street that we lived in Malleswaram was frequented by several cart vendors who would pass by with a unique call for action which always piqued my imagination."

Check out Ranganath’s Behance page to see some of his other projects that are inspired by the city. Artworks from the series are also available for purchase at Kulture Shop. Shop here.