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At Kochi, one of the Outings Project

At Goa

At Goa, once again.

At Agonda, Goa

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Showcase 20 Mar 2017

Outings Project comes to India

There is street art and then there is Outings Project. Giving a new lease of life to the ancient and prestigious artworks lodged in museums and galleries across the world by bringing them right in the midst of the public is at the core of the Outings Project. The project, which started about two years ago, involves taking photographs of these artworks and pasting them on the streets to start a dialogue about art. The idea is also to choose works of art that often get lost amongst the more famous ones. The Outings project recently came to India for the first time.

For its India adventure, Outings Project created art in the streets of Mumbai, Goa and Kochi. In Mumbai, Azad Nagar slums is where some of the artworks can be found. In Goa, Outings chose the north part of Nanu Tarkar Pednekar Road in Altinho, Panaji for three of the artworks and Agonda in South Goa for one artwork. Kochi, where the art festival Kochi-Muziris Biennale takes place, some of the Outings artworks can be traced in Faseela Road Kunnumupuram in Fort Kochi.

At Kochi, one of the Outings Project

The main man behind Outings Project is the French visual artist, filmmaker, and former journalist Julien de Casabianca, who refers to these artworks as “patrimony”. “Because it’s your own work now, you can do whatever you want with it,” he says.  It all started with the French Neoclassical artist Jean Auguste Dominique Ingres’s Mademoiselle Caroline Rivière at the Louvre in Paris. When he saw the artwork, Casabianca had this sudden impulse to rescue the “girl” from the museum castle. That was the genesis of Outings.

At Goa

The locations to paste the artworks in India, like elsewhere, were decided simply by walking around the streets. “It's always a spontaneous process. I pick up locations where I fall in love with a wall, with a place and when I have established a sweet contact with the people living around that space. For example, the collage I did with a bike nearby was pasted exactly in front of a house where an old couple was sitting on a couch. I can’t imagine doing it without showing them the artwork, without talking to them about it. And they were so happy to have a new neighbour,” he says.

For the India offshoot, Outings selected ancient art from the online archive of collections in museums of Mumbai and New Delhi and from some of the books in the museums’ libraries.

According to Casabianca, the best part of his experience in India was to be able to create art on people’s homes; to see the reactions of people who agreed to host those artworks on their walls. He also adds that he found Indians to be very respectful towards the artworks. “There have been incidences in other parts of the world where people have removed the artwork almost immediately or have been against putting up the artworks in the first place. Here, however, everyone has been very kind, open and happy to have some beauty on their walls.”

At Goa, once again.

At Agonda, Goa

Like we mentioned earlier, Outings has become much larger than just a street art project. A lot of times, Outings is now invited by the museums themselves to either paste their collections on the streets; do exhibitions of Outings’ work; conduct workshops; or do a large-scale mural based on a particular artwork from their collections. It is also a community-based project where individuals from all over are invited to smoothly glide into Outings’ shoes and create these artworks in their respective cities. Outings’ website explains the entire process of just how to do this here.

Casabianca feels that his and Outings’ India trip is still incomplete, and he can’t wait to come back to visit more places and create more artworks.  

Photographs from Outings Project’s Facebook page