Pioneer_main.jpg

Colour Palette

pallate.jpg
  • LEAD PALETTE

    • Cotton Wool L104 (R 244 G 241 B 234)

  • SUPPORTING PALETTE

    • Code Red X120 (R 196 G 52 B 45)

  • ACCENT PALETTE

    • Code Red X120 (R 196 G 52 B 45)

Pioneer_main.jpg
Showcase 30 Jun 2016

Pioneer

A pioneer celebrates the indomitable spirit of the individual, confident and self-assured. It captures the essence of conviction in an idea and the resolve and strength to see it through.

AKSHAT BHATT 

Principal Architect, Architecture Discipline 

Akshat is the principal architect and founder of Architecture Discipline, an award winning and internationally acclaimed studio that addresses the space between practice and theory. They engage in dialogues between tradition and modernity through an intensive discourse through design. In 2015, he was cited amongst the 50 Most Influential names in Design & Architecture by Architectural Digest and the firm was awarded two prestigious JK Awards.{{image-1}} {{image-2}}

About The Project

The Discovery Centre is intended to demonstrate the upcoming progressive development at Bhartiya City, Bangalore. The brief was to create a flexible ‘Town Hall’ that would also serve as the sales office and corporate office to illustrate the urban initiatives of the development.

As the project is located away from the core of Bangalore, the design had to be iconic so as to establish an identity and to mark its presence from a distance. Typically, a building of this nature is placed at the edge of the site as an open flexible shell that is dressed up, in order to enhance the spatial connect with the visitors. The Discovery Centre, however, is placed at the heart of the site to engage visitors throughout its development, showing the ‘germination’ of a new city, represented by the egg-shaped auditorium straddling the border between interior and exterior spaces.

The building sits at the heart of a large construction site, so we made a skin that appears dynamic while being static, and the ‘egg’ is coloured red so it is visible from a distance. There is no distinction between the interior and exterior, so much that the elevation at the ground level folds away to open the space at the plaza level. It’s really a public space that demonstrates all that is positive about the natural elements in Bangalore—the sunlight, the air, and the greenery. It is a progressive and urban design experience which demonstrates the values of the Bhartiya City development.{{image-3}}{{image-4}} 

Material and Colour 

An egg-shaped auditorium was conceived amidst an urban plaza, to serve as an attractive community space for the community. Built with glass fibre, the auditorium sits amidst a pond with a motif of lotuses, honouring India’s national flower, and forging a connect with the ‘Bhartiya’ City.  

Painted red, the auditorium is a focal point in the current setting. Red as a colour has the longest wavelength, and can be seen from a great distance. The approach through paved roads ends in a raised plaza, with water fountains and wild grass, ensuring air at the plaza is always cool. 

Near the ovoid auditorium flanking the entrance, the lotus flowers in the pond become visible, and you enter into a double-height space with filtered natural light coming through the sun breakers in the roof. 

The frit-printed glass elevation is lined with a mesh of architectural fabric, creating a monochrome, monolithic experience, broken by the red staircase that connects you to the first-floor deck, suspended from the roof. The 17-metre span is column free through the 90-metre length of the building. A cafe, meeting rooms and other spaces, are all detached from the elevation so the identity of the built volume and the objects within are distinct. Everything sits on a uniform base of a locally excavated granite stone.

 

SABYASACHI MUKHERJEE

Designer and Founder, Sabyasachi Couture 

Sabyasachi Couture constantly strives to support craft communities and preserve our textile heritage. The organization currently employs, directly or indirectly, over 1,500 artisans. The vision of the brand is to create sustainable luxury, focusing on what are certainly the most splendid textile and handicraft legacies in the world.{{image-5}}{{image-6}} 

About The Project

Colour is one of the most important elements and part of any fashion brand and for us it is specifically important because the history of the company started with a strong emphasis on colour. My first fashion week was about putting strong contrasting colours together and that is how we got recognised. I think more in the genre of the garments that I am designing. I first choose the colours before I begin designing as it is the most important thing, especially for the Indian market. India is particularly very receptive to colour. 

The space is like a museum, capturing and commemorating old-world charm through the hundreds of pieces of art, vintage photographs, wall coverings, and handpainted chandeliers. A lot of attention and effort went into getting the most minute details just right, and that attention to detail is palpable when you first walk into the space. It is like being teleported into a different place and time.

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The store is located in Mehrauli, in New Delhi. The 13,500 sq. ft. space is divided into two wings by a heritage monument and an expansive staircase. The first of these wings houses women’s bridal wear, trunks made by The Trunks Company, Jaipur, and jewellery, by Kishandas and Co. for Sabyasachi Couture. The second wing is home to the ready-to-wear collection, sarees, kurtas, and the menswear range, along with our iconic new accessories collection.

Material and Colour

Block-printed chintz and eclectic crockery adorn the walls, and create dense compositions, in between the hundreds of vintage photographs and rare Tanjore paintings. A number of different wallpapers are used throughout the space, including a few from my collection, Sabyasachi for Nilaya, from Asian Paints, used in the changing rooms and the jewellery room.

The particular shade of red in our store is what I call the Coromondel Red. It is a cross between a madder and a brick. It is a particular shade of red that is very earthy.  It does not look synthetic and has very strong historical relevance as many colonial British buildings used to be in this colour and for me it is also the Calcutta red.

Nearly a thousand ittar bottles were sourced from the bylanes of Delhi, Lucknow, and Kolkata and arranged meticulously on various desks and console tables. The furniture is colonial, and turn-of-the-century French, sourced from across the globe{{image-9}}{{image-10}} 

The highlight of the space, apart from the clothes themselves, of course, are the more than sixty pieces of art and sculpture, by the Sabyasachi Art Foundation, which are inspired by Qajar paintings from the Persian dynasty and Indian miniatures.

 

IMAGES

AKSHAT BHATT
• All images courtesy Architecture Discipline
SABYASACHI MUKHERJEE
• All images courtesy Shovan Gandhi, except;
• Profile image courtesy Sabyasachi Couture
 
 
 
 
 

Colour Palette

pallate.jpg
  • LEAD PALETTE

    • Cotton Wool L104 (R 244 G 241 B 234)

  • SUPPORTING PALETTE

    • Code Red X120 (R 196 G 52 B 45)

  • ACCENT PALETTE

    • Code Red X120 (R 196 G 52 B 45)