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SHWETA JAIN CHOPRA

Circus Factory products from SJC Designs.

DIVYA THAKUR

Damroo stools/side tables in a white environment.

Damroo table and chairs in a dark setting.

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Showcase 30 Apr 2014

Pop up inspires colour stories

Pop Up celebrates the radiance of the spirit and new beginnings. Fresh neon accents add unexpected pops of colour to neutral, sober environments.

In this issue of Colour Quotient we explore the colour stories of Pop Up through conversations with two creative practitioners—Shweta Jain Chopra (Founder, SJC Designs) and Divya Thakur (Founder, Design Temple). Inspired by the theme colour, Sporting Green–7741, each practitioner shares their interpretation of Pop Up and presents a custom colour palette for the theme.

SHWETA JAIN CHOPRA

SHWETA JAIN CHOPRA 

Founder and Designer, SJC Designs

There has been a designer spirit in me since I was a child. The passion led me to the National Institute of Design in Ahmedabad and gave me the necessary skills to make it in the design world. I won a mentorship with Karim Rashid Inc., New York, that moulded my design style and philosophy. I presently run a handmade design brand called SJC Designs. It started in Seoul, South Korea and has now moved its base to Frankfurt, Germany. The label’s designs are embraced especially by craft lovers and connoisseurs from all over the world who appreciate a little dose of fun in their everyday life. The products are being retailed in stores in the United Kingdom, United States of America, United Arab Emirates, South Korea, and India.

Showcase  

Most of my projects have a bright and fun colour palette. But a collection that resonates with the theme Pop Up would be Circus Factory. The collection is inspired by the simplicity and joy of the days when families used to visit the circus. It consists of delectable circus fairy tales and wanderlust inspired lifestyle products that are quirky and whimsical. The products in this collection are not only adorned as an accessory, but as a state of mind. For this collection to inspire a circus-like feel, it was very important to get the perfect colours in the materials used. My brand respects the importance of the right hue to invoke the right feeling. I want my clients to feel what I felt when I first thought of the collection. This comes through truly with a combination of colours and textures.

Circus Factory products from SJC Designs.

Spirit of Pop Up 

For me Pop Up is a way of life. It is not simply a colour palette, or a visual cue, it is life on an everyday basis. The most exciting event of the day, tends to pop up in your head; a fruit with a hidden tangy flavour, tends to pop in your mouth; the fuchsia tie on a person wearing a black plain suit, tends to be the only thing that pops out when you see him. 

Colours are a visual cue we tend to pick up fast. When we see bright colours together, it triggers all our other senses. A fresh, brightly coloured strawberry has our mouth watering. A bunch of beautiful, brightly coloured flowers makes our heart flutter. I  believe we all experience the feeling of Pop Up every day! Sometimes we experience it with multiple senses, but the one that we seem to feel and register the most, comes through colours and visual cues.

Colour Inspiration

It’s spring season here in Germany, and the colours nature unveils after a long dreary winter bring a strange kind of happiness  to the heart. You see the life pop up where there was once nothing but white snow.  I believe spring is truly nature’s Pop Up  season, with a burst of colours and joy. 

I chose the primary colour as a deeper pink as it adds a more sombre look, accompanied with the issue colour that represents the beautiful shades of green you see along. To add a ‘pop’ to the palette, I chose a shocking pink to add accents and bring out the primary and secondary shades. Presently, my home is being furnished in these shades as well.

DIVYA THAKUR

DIVYA THAKUR 

Founder and Creative Director, Design Temple

As Founder & Creative Director of Design Temple, Divya Thakur is passionate about all things Indian. She is a multidisciplinary designer, who, through her various endeavours, seeks to create a relevant identity for Indian design—one that is not bound by its origin, medium, or time. Having spent nearly a decade in advertising and design, Divya set up Design Temple in 1999. Since then, her work has been shown and retailed at destinations across the globe. Her approach to the retail sector is organic and experimental. Divya’s witty, informative, and impeccably finished products speak a contemporary Indian design language. She was recently invited to speak at India Unlimited, an India + Sweden initiative in Stockholm. Her Damroo range of furniture transformed the lobby of Clarion Hotel in Stockholm. She has been regularly showing at Maison & Objet, Paris. In 2011, she participated in Wallpaper Handmade* at the Salone Del Mobile, Milan. She was commissioned by the V&A Museum, London in 2007 to present her take on Contemporary India. She has showcased the unorganised design sector with an exhibition titled Indigenous India in 2004, Milan.

Showcase

Damroo, is one my most recent and more playful creations. It’s inspired by the popular Indian way of spontaneous gatherings— where people would just gather around the local chowk, pull up modhas or stools made of bamboo and indulge in idle banter over a cup of tea. 

Our range celebrates this way of spontaneous living and is created in metal wire that has been painted. It is an excellent example of the skill sets of the human hand and technology. 

It was recently shown as an exercise in Spontaneous Lobby Design at Stockholm and is in spontaneous use at Clarion Hotel, Skanstull, from April 23rd till June 25th in 2014. The Lobby of the Clarion Hotel in Skanstull, doubles up as a watering hole for the bohemian Sodermalm area, in which the hotel is located. 

You can see how we have changed the use of colour in exactly the same product depending on its environment. Against whiter environs we have used the entire object in a pop of bright turquoise or orange. Against a dark black we left the mild steel wires clear, just lacquered and added the pop of colour to the weaving accents of the arm and seat. 

The Damroo range comprises of a dining table, bar stools, small stools or side tables, tokri poufs, arm chairs, and centre tables.

Damroo stools/side tables in a white environment.

Damroo table and chairs in a dark setting.

Spirit of Pop Up 

Anything that startles by definition is a ‘pop’. So, the use of a colour that pops up must provide a point and a counterpoint in order to provide that sense of startle—you need the plain and then something that makes you jump. To me, this pop in colour is best provided by using a palette of muted colours as a point —and putting in shots of colour as accents or counterpoints. 

Colour Inspiration

The inspiration comes from nature. The blues are of the sky—soft and sombre grey. The green is the pop of spring. There is something soothing about this palette, because there is harmony in all natural creation.

 

IMAGES

SHWETA JAIN CHOPRA

All images courtesy Shweta Jain Chopra, except;
• ForestWander » commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Flowerspink-bokeh_-_West_Virginia_-_ForestWander.jpg
• Roberto AI » flickr.com/photos/ empordakoaharia/2337768995/

DIVYA THAKUR

All images courtesy Divya Thakur, except;
• Thomas Tolkien » flickr.com/photos/tomtolkien/8162372360/
• Daniel Rodriguez » flickr.com/photos/drodphoto/8919891805/