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KALA PROJECT
RABARI COLLECTION

During the weaving process, usually two people sit on the loom together. As Rabari rugs are woven horizontally there could be three weavers working at the same time on the larger sizes. Then starts the finishing; clipping all the knotted parts (dots and lines) and making the binding on the edges.

Doshi Levien
Nani Marquina
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Showcase 30 Jun 2016

The India Connection - Nani Marquina

Exploring two projects that emerged due to nanimarquina’s Indian connection.

Driven by a singular desire and a very creative background, Nani established nanimarquina in 1987 with a clear goal to design unique and surprising handcrafted rugs. The idea of blending contemporary design to traditional rugs was well received, and nanimarquina embarked on the adventure of outsourcing production to countries, like India, that offered cultural value with unlimited possibilities for craftsmanship.

Nani Marquina

KALA PROJECT  

Kala means tomorrow and also art. Supporting children’s creativity and imagination to gain a better future is the aim of the Care & Fair initiative, which collaborates with nanimarquina. The Kala project is the culmination of a partnership with India, the firm’s main producer country. Nanimarquina organized a drawing competition among the students of the Care & Fair schools and, using the winning original drawing, the nanimarquina design team developed it and turned it into the Kala rug. Proceeds from sales of this rug are donated to the organization to finance Amita School in Bhadohi. More than 200 Kala rugs have sold so far, which allows nanimarquina to be able to fund the school for three years.

KALA PROJECT

Doshi Levien

Doshi Levien is a London-based design office, established by Nipa Doshi and Jonathan Levien. Doshi Levien’s work celebrates the hybrid and explores the coming together of cultures, technology, storytelling, industrial design and fine craftsmanship.

RABARI COLLECTION   

The Rabari collection consists of four rugs made from 100% New Zealand wool, using hand knotted and woven Sumak techniques. “At the very beginning of the project, we decided to create a series of rugs that evoke the sensual and shiny world of tribal folk embroidery of India. We already had in mind intricately handcrafted embroideries made by the nomadic community of the Rabaris from Kutch region. Nipa’s aunt had an amazing embroidery workshop in Ahmedabad, with 25 highly skilled craftswomen, who were all experts in hand embroidery, working with glistening mirrors, silk and cotton thread and metallic sequins amongst other non-precious materials. The women sat together on rugs on the floor, surrounded by these jewel-like elements scattered around them as they worked. Often a result of group collaboration, the embroideries took several days to complete.”

For more info, visit nanimarquina.com.

 

IMAGES
• All images courtesy nanimarquina, except;
• Doshi Levien profile picture, courtesy Simon Upton