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Walls coming to life

A team of young artists and enthusiasts made this long journey, armed with several cans and pints of paints.

The Khati Village

The Wise Wall project started in September 2017 to document and preserve age-old wisdom of rural areas.

The artists at work

The team of artists, headed by Poornima Sukumar, transformed the learnings into paintings on the walls of the houses.

Local stories, myths and folktales

The Wise Wall Project team extensively documented the local stories, folktales and myths of Khati village during their stay.

Reviving the dilapidates houses

“At Khati, the most important aspect was to bring visibility to a extremely remote village.” – Deepak Ramola, founder, Project FUEL

Hope and Enthusiasm to the residents

Deepak’s team extended their engagement with the village by organizing a fellowship programme to teach youngsters English and basic computer skills.

A derivative of `Aipan`

The style of the art was derived from ‘Aipan’, a traditional folk art made by women in Uttarakhand.

Inspired from the local Gharwal School of Painting

While creating the artworks for the village, Poornima made sure that the art should not shock or offend the residents in any way.

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Showcase 16 May 2018

The Wise Wall Project paints walls of remote Uttarakhand villages to narrate stories and to bring change

Project FUEL collaborated with The Hans Foundation to highlight local stories of Khati village in Uttarakhand through wall art. The village lacks basic amenities, and the project aims to bring attention and support to it. This is the second edition of The Wise Wall Project which started last year in another Uttarakhand village called Saur, known as a ‘ghost’ village due to heavy migration.

It takes a train ride, multiple taxi rides, an overnight stay at a hotel, and a trek of six kilometers to reach Khati, the last village before Uttarakhand’s Pindari Glacier. A team of young artists and enthusiasts made this long journey, armed with several cans and pints of paints. During the one month duration of their stay, the team extensively documented the local stories, folktales and myths of the village. And the team of artists headed by Poornima Sukumar (who is also the founder of Aravani Art Project), transformed these into bright-coloured paintings on the walls of the houses. 

Walls coming to life

A team of young artists and enthusiasts made this long journey, armed with several cans and pints of paints.

“The most important part for us was documenting the wisdom of the village and bringing visibility to an extremely remote village. Because a lot of them have not had exposure to the outside world,” says Deepak Ramola, founder of Project FUEL which aims to collect life-lessons from people and devise innovative ways to pass on those learnings. The Wise Wall Project was a natural extension of Project FUEL. It started at Saur, a village not far from Khati, in September 2017 with the purpose of documenting and preserving age-old wisdom of rural areas. 

The Khati Village

The Wise Wall project started in September 2017 to document and preserve age-old wisdom of rural areas.

The artists at work

The team of artists, headed by Poornima Sukumar, transformed the learnings into paintings on the walls of the houses.

Khati is not an abandoned village. But it lacks basic amenities like electricity, phone network, healthcare facilities, and livelihood options. The problem at the core is that the village has no roads. Deepak worries that if basic amenities are not provided to the village, it stands the risk of migration like Saur.

Deepak and Poornima teamed up for this, and painted the dilapidated houses of Saur — some occupied, most abandoned — with stories and life-lessons narrated by the few remaining villagers. Deepak’s team extended their engagement with the village by organizing a fellowship programme to teach youngsters English and basic computer skills.  

Hope and Enthusiasm to the residents

Deepak’s team extended their engagement with the village by organizing a fellowship programme to teach youngsters English and basic computer skills.

Unlike Saur, Khati is not an abandoned village. But it lacks basic amenities like electricity, phone network, healthcare facilities, and livelihood options. The problem at the core is that the village has no roads. Deepak worries that if basic amenities are not provided to the village, it stands the risk of migration like Saur. The Hans Foundation NGO, which has been working in about eight villages in the region on issues like sanitation, health, and education, reached out to Project FUEL with a proposal to adopt Khati for the second edition of The Wise Wall Project.

Local stories, myths and folktales

The Wise Wall Project team extensively documented the local stories, folktales and myths of Khati village during their stay.

Reviving the dilapidates houses

“At Khati, the most important aspect was to bring visibility to a extremely remote village.” – Deepak Ramola, founder, Project FUEL

While creating the artworks for the village, Poornima made sure that the art should not shock or offend the residents in any way. It should also remain rooted in the place. The style of the art was derived from ‘Aipan’, a traditional folk art made by women in Uttarakhand. The art on the walls of Saur was also inspired from the local Gharwal School of Painting which the locals relate with.

A derivative of `Aipan`

The style of the art was derived from ‘Aipan’, a traditional folk art made by women in Uttarakhand.

The Wise Wall Project has brought enthusiasm and hope to the residents of these remote village, and will hopefully pave the way for a bigger change.

Inspired from the local Gharwal School of Painting

While creating the artworks for the village, Poornima made sure that the art should not shock or offend the residents in any way.

You can read more about the experiences of the team during the first Wise Wall Project here.