AI3_24_2017_4_36_15_AM_Namfon_latestmainimage.jpg
Inspirations

Colours derived from various aspects of Chiang Mai

Woven Fabrics

Woven Fabric inspired by Architecture

Woven Fabric inspired by the Textiles

Fabric inspired by Texture

Fabrics inspired by folk & belief, and urban lifetsyle

Artworks

Textile Art inspired by Textiles of Chiang Mai

Textile Art inspired by Folk & Belief

Textile Art inspired by Texture

Textile Art inspired by Architecture

Textile Art inspired by Urban Lifestyle

AI3_24_2017_4_36_15_AM_Namfon_latestmainimage.jpg
Showcase 03 Feb 2017

Weaving Threads from the fabric of Chiang Mai: Namfon Laistrooglai

In the North of Thailand, lies Chiang Mai, an old city as well as a growing economy that’s transformed itself in essence, magnitude as well as creativity. Drawing inspiration from the Lanna traditions, culture, folk and architecture of Chiang Mai, Namfon Laistrooglai, a researcher, lecturer and fashion design, creates 5 textile artworks for the exhibition at the Chiang Mai Design Week 2016.

The 2nd edition of Chiang Mai Design Week 2016 brought us to the vibrant, moderately-sized, seemingly relaxed of Chiang Mai. The air here is laden with the fresh and addictive smell of greens and waters, and a laid back slumber mood of the agricultural hamlets characteristic of south-east Asia. Yet, Chiang Mai is abuzz with creativity. Chiang Mai, means "new city”, a city that goes back to 1296 when it was founded by the Lanna kingdom, a reign that gave the city its architectural and cultural identity. 

Inspirations

Colours derived from various aspects of Chiang Mai

Organised annually in collaboration with the Thailand Centre for Design & Creativity, TCDC, Chiang Mai Design Week (CMDW) transforms this city into a hub for local as well as international creative entrepreneurs, urbanists, academics, administrators, researchers and change makers. CMDW 2016 had ample to offer for architects, designers, film-makers, photographers, urban & rural planners, activists, students and more, via conferences, seminars and exhibitions. What stood out for us was an art exhibition by Namfon Laistrooglai, hosted at the Lanna Architecture Centre. 

Namfon is a lecturer of the Fashion Design Department under the Faculty of Decorative Arts, Silpakorn University and is an expert in textile, fashion and shoe design with a particular interested in Ikat fabric and fibre study. Her series of artworks in the exhibit was called “Model Project on Colour Scheme Design: for Regional Colour of Chiang Mai Province through Fashion and Textile Art” composed of 5 colour schemes that characterise Chiang Mai: colours inspired by Architecture, Textile, Folk & Belief, Texture and Urban Lifestyle. 

To create these artworks, Namfon conducted first-hand local photographic research and then applied a filter of digital photograph evaluation. Describing the process she explains, the photographs were evaluated using a Trichromatic Colour Analyser that identified the colour of shortlisted photographs in a Natural Colour System (NCS).” Then her team matched the analysed colours to the Pantone Formula Guide for solid matt. Some of the colours were derived through abstract observations, which aren’t immediately identified in the cityscapes, such as the colour blue-green in the piece inspired by Folk & Beliefs, which was derived by observing the background of a temple, full of a fresh blue sky with lush green trees. 

Woven Fabrics

Woven Fabric inspired by Architecture

Woven Fabric inspired by the Textiles

Fabric inspired by Texture

Fabrics inspired by folk & belief, and urban lifetsyle

The colours were then matched with Pantone (Fashion, Home & Interiors), as a reference to select colours that could be used to dye the cotton and silk fabrics which would ultimately form the body of her art. Once the cottons and silks were dyed, they were woven into fabrics as well as into complex patches of art pieces, mashed together by interweaving and shredding. “The 5 pieces of fashion and textile modern art represent the intermingling of art and sciences in the province of Chiang Mai,” stated Namfon.

Artworks

Textile Art inspired by Textiles of Chiang Mai

Textile Art inspired by Folk & Belief

The series was part of Namfon’s research funded by the National Research Council of Thailand, as well as her ongoing research on a subject she loves – Colour. Chiang Mai is a colourful region where the indigenous tribes still live in the forests and mountains, the farming families still grow their paddy fields as a means of life.

Textile Art inspired by Texture

Textile Art inspired by Architecture

Textile Art inspired by Urban Lifestyle

In parallel, more and more coffee- and tea-based social enterprises are giving rise to a locally-bred coffee (and a lesser tea) culture, plantation and estates and design enterprises in textiles, lifestyle, product, furniture and hospitality are on the rise. By  capturing this diversity and richness in art and colour, Namfon Laistrooglai enables us to really pick out the colours of the fabric of Chiang Mai.

For more on Chiang Mai Design Week, visit http://www.chiangmaidesignweek.com/