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Frank Lloyd Wright: A Celebration Showcase of 450 architectural works:MoMA conservator Ellen Moody prepares a wood and paperboard model of Frank Lloyd Wright’s St. Mark’s-in-the-Bouwerie Towers for restoration. The St. Mark's Tower model will be one of many featured in the upcoming exhibition.

Model of St. Mark’s-in-the-Bouwerie. Unbuilt project. New York, New York. 1927-31

Painted wood. 53 x 16 x 16″ (134.6 x 40.6 x 40.6 cm). The Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation Archives (The Museum of Modern Art | Avery Architectural & Fine Arts Library, Columbia University, New York).

Fallingwater (Kaufmann House), Mill Run, Pennsylvania. 1934–37

Perspective from the south. Pencil and colored pencil on paper, 15 3/8 × 25 1/4″ (39.1 × 64.1 cm). The Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation Archives (The Museum of Modern Art | Avery Architectural & Fine Arts Library, Columbia University, New York)

Unity Temple, Oak Park, Illinois. 1905–08

Perspective from the west. Watercolor and ink on paper, 12 × 25 1/8″ (30.5 × 63.8 cm). The Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation Archives (The Museum of Modern Art | Avery Architectural & Fine Arts Library, Columbia University, New York)

Rosenwald Foundation School (La Jolla, California). Unbuilt Project. 1928

Pencil and color pencil on tracing paper. 12 3/4 x 25 7/8” (32.4 x 65.7 cm). The Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation Archives (The Museum of Modern Art | Avery Architectural & Fine Arts Library, Columbia University, New York).

Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York. 1943–59. Model.

Painted wood, plastic, glass beads, ink, and watercolor on paper, 28 x 62 x 44″ (71.1 x 157.5 x 111.8 cm). The Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation Archives (The Museum of Modern Art | Avery Architectural & Fine Arts Library, Columbia University, New York)

Unveiling the 22-foot-high (6.7-meter-high) visualization of The Mile-High Illinois at the October 16, 1956, press conference in Chicago

The Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation Archives (The Museum of Modern Art | Avery Architectural & Fine Arts Library, Columbia University, New York)

Madison Civic Center (Monona Terrace), Madison, Wisconsin. Project, 1938–59

Night perspective from the west, 1955. Ink and pencil on paper mounted to plywood, 20 x 40″ (81.3 x 101.6 cm). The Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation Archives (The Museum of Modern Art | Avery Architectural & Fine Arts Library, Columbia University, New York)

mperial Hotel, Tokyo. 1913–23

Cross section looking east. Ink, pencil, and colored pencil on drafting cloth, 15 x 40 in. (38.1 x 101.6 cm). The Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation Archives (The Museum of Modern Art | Avery Architectural & Fine Arts Library, Columbia University, New York)

Plan for Greater Baghdad, Baghdad. Project, 1957

Aerial perspective of the cultural center and University from the north. Ink, pencil, and colored pencil on tracing paper, 34 7/8 x 52″ (88.6 x 132.1 cm). The Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation Archives (The Museum of Modern Art | Avery Architectural & Fine Arts Library, Columbia University, New York)

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Updates 04 Apr 2017

Frank Lloyd Wright at 150: Unpacking the Archive

An architectural genius, rebel and visionary, Frank Lloyd Wright pioneered futuristic concepts in architecture in the 20th century. Celebrating his contribution, MoMA will be exhibiting 450 of his works on his 150th birthday, this June.

As a mark of honour and reverence, MoMA (Museum of Modern Art) will be exhibiting Frank Lloyd Wright’s work and life on his 150th birthday, this June at New York. Born on the 8th of June 1867 in Wisconsin, Wright was radical in nature and often entwined new materials and technologies to his work. Wright strove to introduce concepts that were ahead of his time to architecture, one of which includes the do-it-yourself construction system.

Frank Lloyd Wright: A Celebration Showcase of 450 architectural works:MoMA conservator Ellen Moody prepares a wood and paperboard model of Frank Lloyd Wright’s St. Mark’s-in-the-Bouwerie Towers for restoration. The St. Mark's Tower model will be one of many featured in the upcoming exhibition.

Titled, Frank Lloyd Wright at 150: Unpacking the Archive, this exhibition would feature 450 works of the architect ranging from models and textiles to furniture and architectural drawings over a span of 60 years from the 1890s to 1950s. The exhibition burrows into Wright’s theories marked against his work that bracket social politics, urban planning and nature. Constructed as an anthology, Frank Lloyd Wright at 150 is segregated into 12 components, each of which thrives on a key object from the archives of the Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation in an effort to open up his work to a larger audience for debate and critical enquiry as well as introduce the audience to new interpretations.

The archives of the Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation that were transferred to Avery Architectural & Fine Arts Library at Columbia and MoMA in 2012 worked as an occasion to express Wright’s perspective with regards to his legacy and work. Also recognised as the most distinguished architect of the 20th century, let’s take a look at a few key works of Frank Lloyd that would showcase at the exhibition: Beth Sholom Synagogue, the Johnson Wax Administration Building, Fallingwater, Unity Temple and the Robie House and a design proposed for the Rosenwald School for African American children. In addition, 10 buildings designed by Wright were nominated under the UNESCO World Heritage list, two of which include the Fallingwater and Taliesin West that are occupied by the Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation and School of Architecture.

Fallingwater (Kaufmann House), Mill Run, Pennsylvania. 1934–37

Perspective from the south. Pencil and colored pencil on paper, 15 3/8 × 25 1/4″ (39.1 × 64.1 cm). The Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation Archives (The Museum of Modern Art | Avery Architectural & Fine Arts Library, Columbia University, New York)

Unity Temple, Oak Park, Illinois. 1905–08

Perspective from the west. Watercolor and ink on paper, 12 × 25 1/8″ (30.5 × 63.8 cm). The Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation Archives (The Museum of Modern Art | Avery Architectural & Fine Arts Library, Columbia University, New York)

Rosenwald Foundation School (La Jolla, California). Unbuilt Project. 1928

Pencil and color pencil on tracing paper. 12 3/4 x 25 7/8” (32.4 x 65.7 cm). The Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation Archives (The Museum of Modern Art | Avery Architectural & Fine Arts Library, Columbia University, New York).

Rare and unique futuristic pieces in the time of Floyd Wright include St. Marks. It now holds value as an object of study and inspiration. Even though St. Mark’s was unbuilt, it was designed as a skyscraper residence for the city of New York. Another is the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum that showcases the drawings of Wright.

Model of St. Mark’s-in-the-Bouwerie. Unbuilt project. New York, New York. 1927-31

Painted wood. 53 x 16 x 16″ (134.6 x 40.6 x 40.6 cm). The Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation Archives (The Museum of Modern Art | Avery Architectural & Fine Arts Library, Columbia University, New York).

Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York. 1943–59. Model.

Painted wood, plastic, glass beads, ink, and watercolor on paper, 28 x 62 x 44″ (71.1 x 157.5 x 111.8 cm). The Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation Archives (The Museum of Modern Art | Avery Architectural & Fine Arts Library, Columbia University, New York)

With over 1,000 projects featured against Wright’s name globally, right from products, municipal plans, landscape designs to education programs that have now been converted to the Frank Lloyd Wright School of Architecture, Frank’s design practice encapsulates all building types and scales. These include, residences, skyscrapers, landscape designs, regional and community plans to furniture, rug patterns and light fixtures.

Unveiling the 22-foot-high (6.7-meter-high) visualization of The Mile-High Illinois at the October 16, 1956, press conference in Chicago

The Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation Archives (The Museum of Modern Art | Avery Architectural & Fine Arts Library, Columbia University, New York)

Madison Civic Center (Monona Terrace), Madison, Wisconsin. Project, 1938–59

Night perspective from the west, 1955. Ink and pencil on paper mounted to plywood, 20 x 40″ (81.3 x 101.6 cm). The Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation Archives (The Museum of Modern Art | Avery Architectural & Fine Arts Library, Columbia University, New York)

mperial Hotel, Tokyo. 1913–23

Cross section looking east. Ink, pencil, and colored pencil on drafting cloth, 15 x 40 in. (38.1 x 101.6 cm). The Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation Archives (The Museum of Modern Art | Avery Architectural & Fine Arts Library, Columbia University, New York)

Plan for Greater Baghdad, Baghdad. Project, 1957

Aerial perspective of the cultural center and University from the north. Ink, pencil, and colored pencil on tracing paper, 34 7/8 x 52″ (88.6 x 132.1 cm). The Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation Archives (The Museum of Modern Art | Avery Architectural & Fine Arts Library, Columbia University, New York)