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Flynn Talbot

A lighting artist and designer, Flynn Talbot is from Perth, Australia but is currently based in London, UK.

First of its kind

Reflection Room was one of the installations commissioned to be displayed at Victoria & Albert Museum. Though LDF and V&A have been working together for years, this is the first of any of the installations being housed at the Prince Consort Gallery.

Creating magic with lights

The starting point for each project is typically the same. Flynn begins with considering the ‘light effect’ and then plans the project around it.

Borrowing from textiles

“When I came here, I thought, what’s my story,” said Flynn Talbot. The room, previously housed over 30,000 textile samples and Flynn was particular about keeping this narrative going while adding his own layer to it.

Soaked in LED

The vaulted space is lit at each end to highlight and define the dramatic 35m length of the gallery.

Otherworldly space

In Flynn’s signature palette, the installation uses blue and orange as its primary colours, much like the warm and energetic hues of the sunsets he remembers from Perth, Australia

Blooming with interaction

Flynn hoped that people would wander around, walking, stopping and shifting to interact with the installation. In fact, interaction is core to Reflection Room, as it truly comes alive when people are illuminated in hues of blue and orange.

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Updates 27 Sep 2017

Flynn Talbot’s Reflection Room synthesises light, people and yesteryear’s textiles

The London Design Festival has established itself over years as a key calendar moment. Witnessing some of the greatest thinkers, practitioners, retailers and educators celebrating London as the design capital of the world, the festival recently returned for its 15th year. Hundreds of unique events were organised across the city to celebrate design spanning the globe. One of the highlights was an immersive coloured light experience, ‘Reflection Room’, CQ takes a quick glimpse.

Commissioning a magical experience

When one of the world’s leading museums of art, design and performance collaborated to become the hub for London’s premier contemporary design festival, magic was bound to unfurl. 

So, taking their long-standing relationship with the Victoria and Albert Museum, London (V&A) to its ninth year, London Design Festival saw a transformation of iconic spaces within the museum using commissioned installations and displays by contemporary designers. ‘Reflection Room’ by Flynn Talbot was one of the experiences at the nucleus of their commissions this year. It was also the first of any London Design Festival installations to be housed in the Prince Consort Gallery.

Flynn Talbot

A lighting artist and designer, Flynn Talbot is from Perth, Australia but is currently based in London, UK.

First of its kind

Reflection Room was one of the installations commissioned to be displayed at Victoria & Albert Museum. Though LDF and V&A have been working together for years, this is the first of any of the installations being housed at the Prince Consort Gallery.

Seeking from the site

When Flynn Talbot visited the gallery, he knew he wanted to add another layer to the tale in order to connect the dots between light, people and place. The lighting artist and designer said, “I conceived the idea standing in the gallery, and wanted to add my story on top of the beautiful existing architecture but not to take it over.”

Creating magic with lights

The starting point for each project is typically the same. Flynn begins with considering the ‘light effect’ and then plans the project around it.

The room, previously housed over 30,000 textile samples and this was central to Flynn’s process of ideation as he wanted to create a magical experience that would embrace its past, while adding a futuristic veneer. 

Dipped in LED sunset hues

Reflective of the warm and energetic light spilling as the sun sets every day at Perth, Australia, where he is from, the installation borrowed blue and orange as its primary colours. Using 56 custom-made stretch membrane Barrisol panels in gloss black, anyone walking in was instantly lit in its hues. Woven within these panels were Tryka LED profiles emitting coloured light and altering the room into a seemingly otherworldly space.

Borrowing from textiles

“When I came here, I thought, what’s my story,” said Flynn Talbot. The room, previously housed over 30,000 textile samples and Flynn was particular about keeping this narrative going while adding his own layer to it.

Soaked in LED

The vaulted space is lit at each end to highlight and define the dramatic 35m length of the gallery.

 

However, for Talbot, the experience truly came alive beyond colours and creation when people stepped into the room. The installation bloomed with interaction as people meandered around – walking, stopping and shifting. As it happens, interaction was central to the installation, adding a spectrum of possibilities to the hues depending on where each person was standing.

Otherworldly space

In Flynn’s signature palette, the installation uses blue and orange as its primary colours, much like the warm and energetic hues of the sunsets he remembers from Perth, Australia

Blooming with interaction

Flynn hoped that people would wander around, walking, stopping and shifting to interact with the installation. In fact, interaction is core to Reflection Room, as it truly comes alive when people are illuminated in hues of blue and orange.

 

Reflection Room was on display at the V&A, London between 16 – 24 September as part of the London Design Festival. Follow Flynn to know about Reflection Room on instagram via @flynntalbot. Flynn Talbot’s other works are here.