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The Studio space: Before and After

The Victorian structure’s large fenestrations, brick walls, wooden columns and trusses were closed in and covered up with layers of plaster, paint, boards and AC vents. In the process of uncovering the butchered architecture, the architects found their distinctive space.

The front office: Before and After

When the architect first visited his soon-to-be studio, the 3700 sqft. double-heighted volume was home to dust, darkness and pigeons.

The plan and the sections

As with all projects, the requirements of the project i.e. the needs of the Studio was defined and laid out. Albeit, the planning itself was somewhat dictated by the structure.

Underneath the large trusses

The trusses in the central part of the structure gave way to a considerable volume, demanding to be more public and interactive, and eventually becoming what is now the atrium, the reception and the main studio with the workstations.

The central aspect: the Studio

Designed to be a multifunctional, liveable space, the Studio breaks the mould of typical office interiors.

An axonometric view and the material palette of the Loft

Stripped to originality, the studio was only coloured as requested for by the material creating different identities for each space without drawing from the overall flavour.

The atrium

The Studio’s ‘transparency’ doesn’t stop there, the interiors too were opened out or connected through glass facades creating a visual interaction throughout the large expanse.

The exposed services, an add-on to the Studio`s tranperancy

Being devoid of wall panels and false ceilings, the substantially transparent studio, also has exposed services. Sometimes masked well into the exposed trusses, sometimes left bare– as in case of AC ducts – the structure seems shed inhibition.

Colours and Materials

Leaving most of the materials in raw form, some brick walls saw a layer of white paint added, since the reflective colour doesn’t interfere with the interplay of the other exposed materials.

The library

With the intriguing design philosophy to address the previously unaddressed in the public sector of schools and institutions, the architect leaves us hoping to see more of his work soon.

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Workspace 20 Mar 2018

Delayering the layers of time and use, Studio PKA uncovered their ideal workspace in the Loft

The story and the design of Studio PKA’s studio unfolds with the architects gradually uncovering the layers of time that had settled on to the building. The Loft is a design not built into an existing structure, but one in conversation with it. Atypical to the more common approach, the Loft tells the tale of a structure that commandeered the design of the space just as much as the needs of the studio and the dreams of the architect did. CQ uncovers more.

With a dream that had been manifesting for quite sometime, Architect Puran Kumar and his team of Studio PKA set out to find the apt workspace, “A space that is you, that talks about you, that becomes you and you become the space,” he reflects. Aside from the convenience of his primary clientele being in South Bombay, the idea of a space in the glorious, art district of the city seemed fitting of a 25-year old practice. In line with his vision of heading to the top, the Studio found its niche atop a 100 year old Grade II heritage structure in Fort, Mumbai. 

The Studio space: Before and After

The Victorian structure’s large fenestrations, brick walls, wooden columns and trusses were closed in and covered up with layers of plaster, paint, boards and AC vents. In the process of uncovering the butchered architecture, the architects found their distinctive space.

When the architect first visited his soon-to-be studio, the 3700 sq.ft. double-heighted volume was home to dust, darkness and pigeons. Over years of being used, by offices and godowns, the Victorian structure’s large fenestrations, brick walls, wooden columns and trusses were closed in and covered up with layers of plaster, paint, boards and AC vents. In the process of uncovering the butchered architecture, the architects found their distinctive space. 

The front office: Before and After

When the architect first visited his soon-to-be studio, the 3700 sqft. double-heighted volume was home to dust, darkness and pigeons.

The demands of the structure and the needs of the Studio

As with all projects, the requirements of the project i.e. the needs of the Studio were defined and laid out. Albeit, the planning itself was somewhat dictated by the structure. The trusses in the central part of the structure gave way to a considerable volume, demanding to be more public and interactive, and eventually becoming what is now the atrium, the reception and the main studio with the workstations. 

The plan and the sections

As with all projects, the requirements of the project i.e. the needs of the Studio was defined and laid out. Albeit, the planning itself was somewhat dictated by the structure.

The same roof changes direction and style towards the end of the building, catering to the more exclusive areas, such as the White Room (for client meetings) and the principal architect’s office. Similarly, the Studio also inherited the existing mezzanines that appealed to be an even more secluded zone, hosting the library, the cafeteria and the den.

Underneath the large trusses

The trusses in the central part of the structure gave way to a considerable volume, demanding to be more public and interactive, and eventually becoming what is now the atrium, the reception and the main studio with the workstations.

The central aspect: the Studio

Designed to be a multifunctional, liveable space, the Studio breaks the mould of typical office interiors.

“A space that is you, that talks about you, that becomes you and you become the space.”

Delayering the structure

The openings in the structure were opened up, the walls unplastered and the paints scraped off, and the building was rediscovered as what it was built as. “You owe it to the building, to the architecture as well as to the people who are going to use this space,” Puran Kumar elaborates. Not only do the large arched windows let in South Bombay’s cultural personality, but also help the occupants reconnect with the world beyond their space. 

An axonometric view and the material palette of the Loft

Stripped to originality, the studio was only coloured as requested for by the material creating different identities for each space without drawing from the overall flavour.

The Studio’s transparency doesn’t stop there, the interiors too were opened out or connected through glass facades creating a visual interaction throughout the large expanse.

Being devoid of wall panels and false ceilings, the substantially transparent studio, also has exposed services. Sometimes masked well into the exposed trusses, sometimes left bare– as in case of AC ducts – the structure seems to shed all inhibition. 

The atrium

The Studio’s ‘transparency’ doesn’t stop there, the interiors too were opened out or connected through glass facades creating a visual interaction throughout the large expanse.

Colours that are prescribed by the materials

Stripped to originality, the studio was only coloured as requested for by the material creating different identities for each space without drawing from the overall flavour. Leaving most of the materials in raw form, some brick walls saw a layer of white paint added. White, since the reflective colour doesn’t interfere with the interplay of the other exposed materials.

The flooring, similarly, was left to be in shades of grey to complement and contrast the exposed brick. The metal members – trusses, columns – initially painted in teal by generations bygone, were restored to their original black colour. 

The exposed services, an add-on to the Studio`s tranperancy

Being devoid of wall panels and false ceilings, the substantially transparent studio, also has exposed services. Sometimes masked well into the exposed trusses, sometimes left bare– as in case of AC ducts – the structure seems shed inhibition.

While the burnt wood truss in the workstation zone was painted with a light coat of white, leaving the rest of the roof to its natural tonalities. 

Colours and Materials

Leaving most of the materials in raw form, some brick walls saw a layer of white paint added, since the reflective colour doesn’t interfere with the interplay of the other exposed materials.

“You owe it to the building, to the architecture as well as to the people who are going to use this space.”

Beyond the Loft

Carrying forward the air of inspiration brought about by the studio and its premise, Puran Kumar divulges his plans of reaching out beyond the arched windows and beyond spaces meant for personal consumption. With the intriguing design philosophy to address the previously unaddressed in the public sector of schools and institutions, the architect leaves us hoping to see more of his work soon. 

The library

With the intriguing design philosophy to address the previously unaddressed in the public sector of schools and institutions, the architect leaves us hoping to see more of his work soon.

Keep up with their work on their website or check out their Instagram to see the happenings in and beyond the Loft.

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