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Oyster Bath

Oyster Bath is a luxury brand making saunas and bathing fixtures, Porcelanosa is a Spanish modular kitchen company.

the experience center for Oyster Bath

Bricolage Bombay is a multidisciplinary studio that explores and works in various realms including architecture, design and media. They often borrow ideas from pop culture, parametric thinking, films and games to transcend a unidimensional approach to work.

The musical wall

While the wall doesn’t hum melodies, the architects from Bricolage Bombay who designed the structure composed it to read as a musical score.

The chemistry the earthy tones create with the dark wall

The brick-coloured dividing wall stands out amidst the dark walls of the Oyster Bath showroom, reminiscent of an earthy tone. The wall mimics changing musical notations as the surface varies every 4 feet.

The dark wall, with light playing along it

With lights from the Porcelanosa showroom and dark walls from the Oyster Bath showroom, the space prepares the visitors’ eyes for the interiors that will follow.

The reception in between

The shared reception area that borrows elements from both showrooms precedes the main entry. With lights from the Porcelanosa showroom and dark walls from the Oyster Bath showroom

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Workspace 18 Aug 2017

Music and the making of the Oyster Showroom wall by Bricolage Bombay

When he received the brief, Vinit knew that creating an experience for architects and interior designers meant going the extra mile to construct something impressive and completely immersive. CQ speaks to Bricolage Bombay’s founder Vinit Nikumbh about one of their recent projects where music and architecture meet to create a rhythmic sight.

Separating an experience center for Oyster Bath and the display showroom for Porcelanosa is a musical wall. While the wall doesn’t hum melodies, the architects from Bricolage Bombay who designed the structure composed it to read as a musical score. 

Bricolage Bombay is a multidisciplinary studio that explores and works in various realms including architecture, design and media. They often borrow ideas from pop culture, parametric thinking, films and games to transcend a unidimensional approach to work. Music too, has been on their radar for some time. Vinit Nikumbh, founder at Bricolage Bombay says, “Music is a larger idea that has subconsciously been an ongoing aesthetic in the studio.”

Oyster Bath

Oyster Bath is a luxury brand making saunas and bathing fixtures, Porcelanosa is a Spanish modular kitchen company.

 

The Brief

Commissioned by DJ Appliances to design the 6000 sq.ft space, the team knew from the get go that they had to build two distinct spaces, in functionality and design. While Oyster Bath is a luxury brand making saunas and bathing fixtures, Porcelanosa is a Spanish modular kitchen company. A shared reception area that borrows elements from both showrooms precedes the main entry. With lights from the Porcelanosa showroom and dark walls from the Oyster Bath showroom, the space prepares the visitors’ eyes for the interiors that will follow. “The brief was pretty complex so we had to do an entire round of services to ensure the tubs and bathing fixtures were at least 40 feet away from the water tanks,” Vinit said referring to the client’s requirement for fully functioning bathtubs and showering equipment to showcase the complete bathing and sauna experience. The end goal for both Bricolage Bombay and Oyster Bath was to create displays that would help customers and facilitators visualise the fixtures in their homes.

the experience center for Oyster Bath

Bricolage Bombay is a multidisciplinary studio that explores and works in various realms including architecture, design and media. They often borrow ideas from pop culture, parametric thinking, films and games to transcend a unidimensional approach to work.

 “Music is a larger idea that has subconsciously been an ongoing aesthetic in the studio.”

A Musical Approach to Architecture

Having followed architect, composer and music theorist Iannis Xenakis’ work for a few years, Vinit was in awe of the the computerised musical composition tool that he had devised. UPIC or Unité Polyagogique Informatique CEMAMu was developed by Xenakis as a way to traverse traditional musical notations. Subsequently used by composers such as Jean-Claude Risset, François-Bernard Mâche and Takehito Shimazu, the device served as an intuitive graphical tablet where the user could draw and organize sound waves into musical scores. 

The brick-coloured dividing wall stands out amidst the dark walls of the Oyster Bath showroom, reminiscent of an earthy tone. The wall mimics changing musical notations as the surface varies every 4 feet. When viewed together, it creates a musical score.

The musical wall

While the wall doesn’t hum melodies, the architects from Bricolage Bombay who designed the structure composed it to read as a musical score.

“This had been running in my mind for a while. The length and width of the wall also seemed perfect to create this structure,” Vinit said, explaining the design decision. “We thought of composing the wall using a small element in order to be able to move it. So we started with the conventional brick.” Thinking of music as patterns that work in harmony with human perception, the idea for Vinit and his team was to generate emotion, much like listening to a musical composition would.

The chemistry the earthy tones create with the dark wall

The brick-coloured dividing wall stands out amidst the dark walls of the Oyster Bath showroom, reminiscent of an earthy tone. The wall mimics changing musical notations as the surface varies every 4 feet.

 

 “We thought of composing the wall using a small element in order to be able to move it. So we started with the conventional brick.”

Change in Plans & Materials

After finishing the design, the Bricolage Bombay team realised that though they had planned for the wall to be built with bricks, the building’s existing load conditions didn’t allow for such a heavy structure. They needed a smaller unit that would be lightweight, available in similar sizes and also generate the same pattern. The search for an alternative material began and the options ranged from wood to synthetic materials.

The dark wall, with light playing along it

With lights from the Porcelanosa showroom and dark walls from the Oyster Bath showroom, the space prepares the visitors’ eyes for the interiors that will follow.

“Some were expensive and others had their own issues like joineries, so we settled on Siporex,” Vinit explained, referring to autoclaved aerated concrete (AAC), a lightweight, precast, foam concrete building material. (Siporex is a company that manufactures the material.) AAC blocks cut to the required specifications helped reduce the weight while also remaining flexible enough to create the patterns they required.

The reception in between

The shared reception area that borrows elements from both showrooms precedes the main entry. With lights from the Porcelanosa showroom and dark walls from the Oyster Bath showroom

Talking about their other challenges, Vinit expressed that one of the biggest difficulties with bold projects and designs like this is the lack of accurate costing predictions and fabrication support, which tends to scare clients. However, working backwards to create prototypes and scaled models helps ease the process. For Vinit Nikumbh and the Bricolage Bombay team, it meant completing another project with a multidisciplinary approach, and for Oyster Bath and Porcelanosa it meant creating a complete experience for their visitors. After all, with a great team and an understanding client in place, even the most complex technicalities become simpler to bypass. 

Browse Bricolage Bombay’s other projects here.
Learn more about Oyster Bath here and Porcelanosa here.