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The Making. Video by Nopkamon Akarapongpaisan:Bangkok, Thailand based Lamunlamai. Craftstudio specializes in pottery ceramics. The studio was founded in 2012 to create everyday objects including tableware and decorative items. The video show their pottery making process

Lamunlamai.Craftstudio
Prempracha Collection
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Workspace 15 Feb 2017

Tableware at the Chiang Mai Design Week 2016

The origins of Thai ceramics can be dated back to 3600 BCE. Needless to say, this is a craft that has survived and evolved over thousands of years. Today, many contemporary design studios in Asia are using the traditional Thai ceramics’ techniques, but adapting the artform to the context of the everyday lifestyle of a modern consumer. At Chiang Mai Design Week 2016 – an open space where Thailand’s & Chiang Mai’s design community comes together with designers from other countries every year – CQ had a chance to see the creations of three Asian décor and tableware product studios that are doing some really interesting work in this space.

Zan Design, Taipei

Established in 2003, Taipei-based Zan Design Studio specializes in metalwork. The studio is constantly doing research about the possibilities of combining metal, glass and other such materials. It launched its brand Zan Design in 2012 to exclusively create products which use enamel copper as the primary material. Drawing inspirations from everyday life and from the unique Taiwanese culture (tea, flower, calligraphy and incense), Zan Design seeks to blend enamel wares into the culture of contemporary life. Therefore, the ancient craftsmanship is reinterpreted using contemporary aesthetics and design.

Enamel is a glass-like material that can be fused onto metals at 850°C to form a hard and pore-less glazed layer with colorful surfaces. Bonded wares of glass and metal are called enamel wares. To create these, Zan Design coats and fuses enamel material on a well-shaped copper body in an electrical kin. Copper bonds well with enamel, and is considered a breathing metal. As time passes, its luster grows darker or milder becasue of oxidation, accentuating its elegance and antiquity. 

The studio shapes the copper body by forging it or striking it with hand-held tools when manufacturing single pieces. The limited edition products are mass produced by molding.

Lamunlamai.Craftstudio

Bangkok, Thailand based Lamunlamai. Craftstudio specializes in pottery ceramics. The studio was founded in 2012 to create everyday objects including tableware and decorative items.

Lamunlamai.Craftstudio
   

The studio creates handcrafted ceramic products with porcelain clay, using their signature decorating techniques that include glazing, inlay, sgafitto etc. The idea is to create a mélange of contemporary and traditional. The studio takes pride in the fact that no two pieces are ever the same thanks to the aesthetical combination of form, textures and glazes, and due to the fact that each one is uniquely crafted by hand.

You can watch the craft process in the video earlier.

Prempracha Collection

Thailand based Prempracha creates handmade ceramics with the help of local Thai artisans. The underlying theme in their work is the intersection of the west and the east. They amalgamate the Asian artistic sensibilities with western ideas of functionality to reach out to a global consumer base.

Prempracha Collection

Their collections consist of stoneware created either by mold or by hand as per the requirement. The original piece is always formed by hand, however for production in numbers, each piece is made identical to the original using slip-casting or ramp-pressing. The copies are then carefully trimmed and polished to get smooth and even surfaces. They are left to dry for three days to ensure there’s no cracking, after which, they are bisque fired at 800°C. Once the pieces cool down, glaze is applied to their surfaces by dipping, drawing or other techniques. Then, they are fired again at 1,230°C. For some pieces that need extra texture or technique, the artisans apply a second coat of glaze, firing those pieces for a third time at 1,230 °C to complete the process.

Prempracha’s practice revolves around constantly developing new concepts and techniques to adapt to the current fashion and home decor trends in stoneware. Their range includes tableware such as cups, plates and bowls, and décor items like vases, figurines and pots. The studio, with a factory and a store in Chiang Mai, also customizes its designs for its customers.