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VIKARNA BASEMENT

Studio 4000 is an Ahmedabad-based architecture studio that overhauled an old basement into their workspace. A major chunk of work involved tearing down a load-bearing brick wall, excavating the basement and extending the external wall.

BEFORE AND AFTER

The basement was enclosed by a solid wall adjunct by an open space that served as a garden. The studio today is a colourful, semi-open office complete with a veranda and an open-to-sky courtyard.

OF “NASCENT DRAWINGS”

While engineers were consulted for demolishing walls, and technical details like plumbing, etc. were taken into account during construction, much of the studio’s aesthetics are derived as the work progressed.

OF INTUITION

The doors, windows and fixed glass panels are a play of planes meeting, intersecting, dropping and rising. The architects experimented on-site as things progressed and the openings were created based on play of light, vistas, airflow, etc.

OF NOSTALGIA - THE OLD AND NEW SIMULTANEOUSLY

The exposed-brick is the existing boundary wall between the road and the plot. The lower part of the wall was extended further below for plumbing and drainage. While the new wall is painted, the old wall is left in exposed brick for the sake of ‘memories’.

AND SOME MORE NOSTALGIA

The architects also reused furniture from the old office. The old Kota stone flooring dismantled from the old office and was used to create mosaic patterns in the courtyard.

OF KOTA, TERRAZZO AND JAISALMER

Kota and Jaisalmer were reused from the old office. Rest of the flooring is cast-in-situ pigmented terrazzo.

MODIFYING AND REUSING TABLES

One occasionally finds mobile tables propped up on the ledge that outlines the open courtyard. They are tables from the old office and 2 of their legs were shortened. One half of the table rests on the ledge and the other half on the floor and they can be moved around as required.

BUILDING THE PLACE – BRICK-BY-BRICK

Bricks procured from the former office were used to recreate internal walls and a part of the external boundary wall. A brick staircase was introduced to create an entrance from the main road to the studio.

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Workspace 26 Nov 2018

The Vikarna Basement by Studio 4000 has a courtyard, a veranda and is an architect’s studio

Basements are hardly associated with light and colour. And architectural projects are hardly conceived and completed with just “nascent drawings”. But Vikarna Basement is all that and more! The project involved relocation of the architect’s office into the basement of a residential property. CQ unearths a lot of logic, some nostalgia and a sprinkle of intuition that has gone into the making of the architect’s studio.

Studio 4000 is an Ahmedabad-based architecture studio that overhauled an old basement into their workspace. In its original form, the basement was enclosed by a solid wall adjunct by an open space that served as a garden at the upper level. The studio today is a colourful, semi-open office complete with a veranda and an open-to-sky courtyard. And yes, all this transpires in a basement!

VIKARNA BASEMENT

Studio 4000 is an Ahmedabad-based architecture studio that overhauled an old basement into their workspace. A major chunk of work involved tearing down a load-bearing brick wall, excavating the basement and extending the external wall.

Demolishing and developing the studio brick-by-brick

A major chunk of work involved tearing down a load-bearing brick wall, excavating the garden from above and inserting a retaining wall under the existing boundary wall between the plot and road further below its existing foundation.

BEFORE AND AFTER

The basement was enclosed by a solid wall adjunct by an open space that served as a garden. The studio today is a colourful, semi-open office complete with a veranda and an open-to-sky courtyard.

The basement was opened up by demolishing the 18 inch load bearing brick wall that supported two floors over it. The architects consulted a structural engineer under whose supervision the brick wall was dismantled in parts and a steel structure was inserted in its place. They marked the position of circular steel columns and would demolish 2 feet of wall length, construct a footing and introduce a steel column in its place.

Bricks from the partition walls of the basement were carefully dismantled and used to recreate the internal walls of the studio and a part of the external retaining wall. A brick staircase was introduced to create an entrance from the main road to the studio.

OF “NASCENT DRAWINGS”

While engineers were consulted for demolishing walls, and technical details like plumbing, etc. were taken into account during construction, much of the studio’s aesthetics are derived as the work progressed.

A hint of nostalgia

The outer wall enveloping the sunken court is part exposed-brick and its lower half is painted in abstract themes. A stone ledge divides both. The exposed-brick is the existing boundary wall between the road and the plot. The lower part was created when the garden was further excavated for plumbing and drainage. The existing boundary wall and its foundation had no support below it. The architects inserted the new brickwork by excavating the earth in parts and extended the old wall. While the new wall is painted, the old wall is left in exposed brick for the sake of ‘memories’.

OF INTUITION

The doors, windows and fixed glass panels are a play of planes meeting, intersecting, dropping and rising. The architects experimented on-site as things progressed and the openings were created based on play of light, vistas, airflow, etc.

OF NOSTALGIA - THE OLD AND NEW SIMULTANEOUSLY

The exposed-brick is the existing boundary wall between the road and the plot. The lower part of the wall was extended further below for plumbing and drainage. While the new wall is painted, the old wall is left in exposed brick for the sake of ‘memories’.

While the new wall is painted, the old wall is left in exposed brick for the sake of ‘memories’.

But why further excavate a basement?

It was possible to create the office and the open courtyard at the same floor level. However, the courtyard was sunk by 2 steps for plumbing and drainage services. The basement also has an underground tank for rainwater to percolate. The drop also endowed the courtyard additional height and a sense of transition.

And underlined with intuition

The doors, windows and fixed glass panels are not regular cutouts in walls but a play of planes meeting, intersecting, dropping and rising. The architects accredit to the fact that as the clients themselves they experimented on-site as things progressed. The openings were created based on play of light, vistas, airflow, etc.

AND SOME MORE NOSTALGIA

The architects also reused furniture from the old office. The old Kota stone flooring dismantled from the old office and was used to create mosaic patterns in the courtyard.

OF KOTA, TERRAZZO AND JAISALMER

Kota and Jaisalmer were reused from the old office. Rest of the flooring is cast-in-situ pigmented terrazzo.

What the architects call “conceived from nascent drawings” is perhaps an indication that not all design is the product of putting pencil to paper or accurately drafted AutoCAD details. While neither means of design can be disputed, what really matters is, is whether the space manages to inspire, engage the senses and keeps boredom away.

MODIFYING AND REUSING TABLES

One occasionally finds mobile tables propped up on the ledge that outlines the open courtyard. They are tables from the old office and 2 of their legs were shortened. One half of the table rests on the ledge and the other half on the floor and they can be moved around as required.

BUILDING THE PLACE – BRICK-BY-BRICK

Bricks procured from the former office were used to recreate internal walls and a part of the external boundary wall. A brick staircase was introduced to create an entrance from the main road to the studio.

The doors, windows and fixed glass panels are not regular cutouts in walls but a play of planes meeting, intersecting, dropping and rising. 

Do look up a ton of other interesting work by Studio 4000 here!