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The Jungalow House

Jungalow House is neither a bungalow nor located in a jungle.

Jungle + Bungalow = Jungalow

projects the image of a bungalow with foliage sprawling across its façade, making its way inside the house through courtyards and open-to-sky cut-outs.

The circular windows

An RCC underground drainage pipe was sliced to create a seamless circular sill and lintel frame.

Ground floor plan

Being a row-house configuration, the building had to be enclosed within a 30ft. width with no windows on either side.

first floor plan

In Jungalow, elements like the chajja, railings and courtyards are used for landscaping and farming.

Second floor plan

Jungalow is a model that the architects envisioned for large-scale development in cities.

Section

Section through the courtyard

Section

Section through the living-dining space.

The living and dining areas

The plantations are concentrated in the bigger of the two courtyards in the building. Every area opens onto a courtyard.

The staircase detail

The tessellated staircase railing is made from a well-pulley rope procured from the agriculturist.

Cutting costs with Kota

Wastage from Kota stone is used to create patterns to demarcate transition areas and so on.

A frugal carpet inspired by S.H Raza

The Kota wastage was also combined to emulate an S.H. Raza painting in the living area.

A bed in Kota

Kota is also used beyond flooring such as in the cladding of the brick base for the beds and the kitchen and seating around the house.

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Workspace 26 Jul 2018

You’d think ‘Jungalow’ is a bungalow in a jungle, but it’s actually a house in Surat

Jungalow, as the name suggests, combines a jungle and a bungalow. The building projects the image of a bungalow with foliage sprawling across its façade, making its way inside the house through courtyards and open-to-sky cut-outs. But in reality, Jungalow is neither a bungalow nor located anywhere near a jungle. It is a residence in an urban row-house in Surat. In fact, Neogenesis+Studi0261 conceptualised the building as a prototype for urban development in cities like Surat that are often criticised for lack of green cover.

The client, an agriculturist, approached Neogenesis+Studi0261 to build a residence within a modest budget. To this, they added a second layer of complexity, i.e. the row-house configuration where each residence shares its peripheral walls with a neighbouring building. The building had to be enclosed within a 30ft. width with no windows on either side. The third layer of complexity was the architects’ aspiration for urban areas.

Jungalow is a model that the architects envisioned for large-scale development in cities that hardly have any green cover, let alone space for agriculture. In Jungalow, elements like the chajja, railings and courtyards are used for landscaping and farming. The vegetation is a mix of decorative plants and subsistence crops. The plantations are concentrated in the bigger of the two courtyards in the building. The smaller courtyard is a Puja area with an exhaust for wind circulation. These courtyards are staggered, breaking what would otherwise have been a linear and compartmentalised core.  

The Jungalow House

Jungalow House is neither a bungalow nor located in a jungle.

Jungle + Bungalow = Jungalow

projects the image of a bungalow with foliage sprawling across its façade, making its way inside the house through courtyards and open-to-sky cut-outs.

Confronting costs with Kota and more

Neogenesis+Studi0261 approached the budget constraints by minimising costs and deriving the design from thereon. The idea was that the basic construction itself should supersede the need for any additional interior finish or ornamentation. The walls are left finished in wall-putty and exposed plaster. To achieve an interesting texture on the walls, the architects made cut-outs in ply to emulate a comb and ran it over the wet plaster during application.

The idea of abstracting agriculture translates to the literal adoption of elements like the rope from the well pulley. The structure is exemplary not only as a standalone residence but a system that can be emulated.

Ground floor plan

Being a row-house configuration, the building had to be enclosed within a 30ft. width with no windows on either side.

first floor plan

In Jungalow, elements like the chajja, railings and courtyards are used for landscaping and farming.

Second floor plan

Jungalow is a model that the architects envisioned for large-scale development in cities.

Section

Section through the courtyard

Section

Section through the living-dining space.

A frugal Raza Carpet in Kota

The architects travelled to Kota and bought 2 truckloads of Kota stone from the quarry at a cost of INR 25 per square-feet. Leather-finished and mirror-finished Kota is used on the floor. Kota stone usually have some variation in shades. The living-room floor had to finished in Kota with a uniform single-shade finish. The differently shaded stones coupled with wastage from the flooring and Kota-bed-base were combined to emulate an S.H. Raza painting in the living area. The remaining wastage was further used to create patterns in the Puja area, to demarcate transition areas and so on. Kota is also used beyond flooring such as in the cladding of the brick base for the beds and the kitchen and seating around the house.

The living and dining areas

The plantations are concentrated in the bigger of the two courtyards in the building. Every area opens onto a courtyard.

The staircase detail

The tessellated staircase railing is made from a well-pulley rope procured from the agriculturist.

Cutting costs with Kota

Wastage from Kota stone is used to create patterns to demarcate transition areas and so on.

A frugal carpet inspired by S.H Raza

The Kota wastage was also combined to emulate an S.H. Raza painting in the living area.

Another creative addition is the circular window. A circular puncture is either a skilled mason’s job to craft an opening in bricks or a tricky affair of casting a circular sill and lintel in RCC. However, for Jungalow, the architects procured an RCC underground drainage pipe and sliced it, creating a seamless sill and lintel frame. As the funds drew to a close, the architects pushed the envelope further. For instance, the tessellated staircase railing is made from a well-pulley rope procured from the agriculturist himself!

The circular windows

An RCC underground drainage pipe was sliced to create a seamless circular sill and lintel frame.

The idea of abstracting agriculture translates to the literal adoption of elements like the rope from the well pulley. The structure is exemplary not only as a standalone residence but a system that can be emulated. At a time when buildings are reproductions of standardised design, one wonders if perhaps Jungalow is a cookie-cutter module that can be put to good use.

To know more on Neogenesis+Studi0261, head here.

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